December 11, 2019

Impeachment Resources from the ACS Network


White House

Latest

ACS Briefing Call: Understanding the Articles of Impeachment, a podcast of the Dec. 11 call held with scholars Mieke Eoyang, Neil Kinkopf, and Paul Rosenzweig explaining the processes ongoing in the House of Representatives, and a potential trial in the Senate. Read a description of the briefing call.

House Hands Down Articles of Impeachment Against President Trump: "A Key Moment in Our Nation’s History", statement by ACS Interim President Zinelle October.

This isn't a partisan hit job; Trump deserves to be impeached, by Nancy Gertner, The Boston Globe. Gertner is a former federal judge and member of the ACS Board of Academic Advisors.

Letter to Congress from Legal Scholarsmore than 500 legal scholars signed a letter stating that the president engaged in impeachable conduct.

Impeachment Hearings

Opening Statement of Professor Pamela S. Karlan, Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, Stanford Law, delivered on December 4, 2019, in front of the House Judiciary Committee. Karlan is the chair of the ACS board of directors. Watch video of testimony.

Opening Statement of Professor Michael Gerhardt, Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence, UNC School of Law, delivered on December 4, 2019, in front of the House Judiciary Committee. Gerhardt is an ACS co-faculty advisor. Watch video of testimony.

Democrats, Don't Overreach on Impeachment, by Caroline Fredrickson, New York Times Opinion. Fredrickson is the President Emerita of ACS.

There’s a Simple Term for What Trump Did and Democrats Should Stick With It, by Renato Mariotti, former federal prosecutor and ACS member.

Gordon Sondland's impeachment testimony on Trump and Ukraine adds up to bribery, by Barbara McQuade, former U.S. attorney, Michigan law professor, and ACS Faculty Advisor.

Gordon Sondland Leaves Us With No Other Option, by Noah Bookbinder, New York Times Opinion. Bookbinder is the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

The Evidence of Wrongdoing by Trump Is Overwhelmingby Noah Bookbinder, New York Times Opinion. Bookbinder is the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

Will the Trump Impeachment Hearings Become a Circus? by Caroline Fredrickson, New York Times Opinion. Fredrickson is President Emerita of ACS, and the author of The Democracy Fix.

Highlights of Taylor-Kent Hearing and Connections to Other Witnessesby Kate Brannen, Tess Bridgemen, and Ryan Goodman, featuring an interview with Barbara McQuade. McQuade is a professor from practice at the University of Michigan Law School, and formerly the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan.

What Trump Is Hiding From the Impeachment Hearings, by Neal K. Katyal, New York Times Opinion. Katyal is a former acting solicitor general and a law professor.

An Open Letter from Over 300 Legal Scholars on Trump Impeachment Inquiry, by Erwin Chemerinsky, Medium. Chemerinsky is the 13th Dean of UC Berkeley, School of Law and the Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law.

Events

Michigan Lawyer Chapter and At-Large Lawyer Chapter, 12/12/2019, A Discussion on Impeachment with Barbara McQuade and Sam Bagenstos 

University of North Texas - Dallas Student Chapter, 12/5/2019, Articles of Impeachment - Happy Hour

Minneapolis-St. Paul Lawyer Chapter, 11/26/2019, Professional Responsibility During Impeachment Proceedings

Bay Area Lawyer Chapter, 11/25/2019, Impeachment - What Now?

Temple Law Student Chapter, 11/25/2019, Discussion with Congresswoman Mary Gay Scanlon

University of Pennsylvania Student Chapter, 11/20/2019, Impeachment: Procedure & Precedent with Professor Michael Gerhardt

Impeachment Offenses

From the ACS Impeachment Blog Symposium: 

Professor Ciara Torres-Spelliscy on Trump's campaign finance violations.

Austin Evers of American Oversight on obstruction of congressional investigations.

Gabe Lezra on emoluments clause violations.

From the ACS Network:

We Already Know Enough to Conclude that President Trump Should Be Impeached and Removed from Office,by Neil Siegel, Balkinization. Siegel is the David W. Ichel Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science, Duke Law School, and Member of the ACS Board of Directors.

The Zelensky Memo Is All the Proof Needed to Impeach Trump, by Noah Bookbinder, New York Times Opinion. Bookbinder is the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

If Whistleblower Is Right, Trump May Have Committed Extortion and Bribery, by Barbara McQuade, The Daily Beast. McQuade is a professor from practice at the University of Michigan Law School, and formerly the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Trump's Ukraine Call Mentioning Biden Is the Strongest Reason Yet for Impeachment, by Leah Litman, NBC News Opinion. Litman is an assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School and serves on the ACS Board of Academic Advisors.

Impeachment Process

ACS Resources:

Impeachment FAQs

LISTEN: ACS held a briefing call on October 4 about the legal and procedural standards for impeachment. Speakers: Mieke Eoyang, Vice President for the National Security Program, Third Way; Michael Gerhardt, Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence, UNC School of Law; and Kara Stein, ACS Vice President of Policy & Program, Moderator.

From the ACS Impeachment Blog Symposium: 

What to Expect When You're Expecting Impeachment, by Neil Kinkopf on the impeachment process. Kinkopf is a professor at the Georgia State University College of Law and an ACS faculty advisor.

From the ACS Network:

Impeachment Does Not 'Overturn' an Electionby Stephen Vladeck, The New York Times. Vladeck is a professor at the University of Texas School of Law and on the Board of Academic Advisors for ACS.

Trump’s Impeachment Strategy: Trick Americans Into Blaming Congressby Barbara McQuade, New York Magazine. McQuade is a professor from practice at the University of Michigan Law School, and formerly the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Yes, Virginia, There Is No Senate Clause, by Daniel Cotter, Harvard Law and Policy Review. Cotter is a Partner at Latimer LeVay Fyock LLC, and an Adjunct Professor at The John Marshall Law School.

Interview with Frank Bowman III, The American Prospect. Bowman is professor of law at the University of Missouri and visiting professor at Georgetown Law. A constitutional scholar, Bowman is author of High Crimes and Misdemeanors: A History of Impeachment for the Age of Trump.

Why the Whistle-Blowing Process Is Breaking Down, by Stephen I. Vladeck, The New York Times. Vladeck is a professor at the University of Texas School of Law and serves on the ACS Board of Academic Advisors.

White House Letter Distorts Both Law and History on ImpeachmentFrank O. Bowman, III, Just Security. Bowman is professor of law at the University of Missouri and visiting professor at Georgetown Law. A constitutional scholar, Bowman is author of High Crimes and Misdemeanors: A History of Impeachment for the Age of Trump.

Privilege Issues

From the ACS Impeachment Blog Symposium: 

Heidi Kitrosser on the president’s abuse of executive secret-keeping powers.

Barbara McQuade on why AG Barr should recuse himself from future proceedings.

David Driesen on how executive privilege might not apply in this scandal.

From the ACS Network:

The House Can Play Hardball, Too. It Can Arrest Giuliani, by Josh Chafetz, The New York Times. Chafetz is a Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown Law Center, and a Professor of Law at Cornell University.

Trump’s Impeachment Defense Boils Down to This: Treat Me Like a King, by Michael Gerhardt, The Washington Post. Gerhardt is the Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law and serves as the faculty advisor to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law ACS student chapter.

Executive power, Separation of Powers and Federalism