ACSBlog

  • February 11, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    Sahil Kapur discusses at Talking Points Memo how supporters of the Affordable Care Act are tailoring their arguments to winning Justice Anthony Kennedy’s vote.

    Joey Meyer and Brianne Gorod argue at the Constitutional Accountability Center that the case against the Affordable Care Act is quickly unraveling.

    The Editorial Board of The Washington Post asserts that despite confusion and resistance, Alabama is a victory for same-sex marriage.

    Luke Brinker writes for Salon that Kansas Governor Sam Brownback has issued an executive order that removes gender identity and sexual orientation from the classes of protected Kansas government employees.

    Walter Shapiro argues at the blog for the Brennan Center for Justice that the influx of big money into the 2016 primaries could interfere with voter preferences.

  • February 10, 2015

    by Nanya Springer

    In recent years, there has been much discussion about whether America is now a “post-racial” society.  The introduction of the first non-white family into the White House was accompanied by some enthusiastic declarations of victory over the scourge of racism.  Observers looked to the president and to other successful minorities and decided that yes, racism is indeed over.

    But focusing on the most successful elements of any demographic group proves little, for wealth has the ability to elevate and to insulate.  One area where this is most evident is in the American criminal justice system.  When navigating the justice system, the ability to hire top-notch legal counsel or to post a significant bond drastically affects the outcome of a case.  This is true for both white citizens and for citizens of color.

    Unfortunately, however, racial inequality in this country remains tightly intertwined with economic inequality, and aspects of the criminal justice system that disadvantage poor people disproportionately disadvantage people of color.  There also exists implicit racial bias, if not outright prejudice, in the hearts of some police, prosecutors, judges and jurors which can manifest itself during any phase of a criminal case.

    The result is that Americans of color face disadvantages at every stage of the criminal justice system.  From arrest to sentencing, obtaining bail to obtaining a lawyer, plea bargaining to jury selection, and even in being put to death, criminal defendants consistently fare better when they are white.

  • February 10, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    Noah Feldman writes in Bloomberg View about the same-sex marriage controversy in Alabama that has emerged after the Supreme Court refused to grant a stay that would have delayed the issuing of marriage licenses for same-sex couples in the state.

    At NPR, Nina Totenberg provides additional coverage of the Supreme Court’s refusal to stop same-sex marriages in Alabama.

    Brian Beutler argues in The New Republic that many Republicans hope that the Supreme Court will save the Affordable Care Act.

    At Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, Leslie Griffin discusses recent consequences of the Hobby Lobby decision and the breadth of potential accommodation to religious employers who object to federal laws.

    Steven Mazie considers at The Economist the four words at the center of the Affordable Care Act case and warns against mere “shoddy draftsmanship” taking away healthcare from millions of Americans.

    On Alternet, ACS’s Jeremy Leaming writes about Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore’s previous attempts to wage a war on the church-state separation.

  • February 9, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Chris Edelson, Assistant Professor of Government, American University School of Public Affairs. Edelson is also author of Emergency Presidential Power: From the Drafting of the Constitution to the War on Terror from the University of Wisconsin Press.

    The misstep Republicans took last month on legislation seeking to prohibit abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy has exposed larger problems related to the party’s position on abortion.  The bill foundered when some House Republicans raised concerns about a provision that would create a “rape exception” to permit abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, but only for victims of rape who report the crime.  Republican House member Rep. Carlos Curbelo said he is “pro-life but . . . had concerns about the bill.”  Rep. Curbelo added that he believed the rape reporting requirement caused “a level of discomfort, especially with the females in our conference.”  Republican leaders in the House agreed with Curbelo and canceled a vote on the legislation, apparently based at least in part on concerns that Republican women in the House would vote as a bloc against the bill because of the wording of the rape reporting provision.

    This unexpected development highlights problems in terms of both logic and politics for Republicans when it comes to abortion and, more broadly, when it comes to women.  The Republican Party has taken a position that strongly suggests abortion is never justified, using language reminiscent of anti-abortion arguments that flatly describe abortion as murder.  The 2012 Republican Party platform declared that “the unborn child has a fundamental individual right to life which cannot be infringed.” That language does not seem to leave room for any exceptions – whether they might be for the health of the pregnant woman or for rape.  Logically, it makes sense for the party to take this stance.  If Republicans believe abortion involves the taking of an innocent life – and elected Republicans frequently make clear that they believe precisely this – then it would not make sense for them to support abortion under any circumstances (other than if the pregnant woman’s life is at risk).

    The problem is that polling shows most Americans reject this position and believe women who are pregnant as the result of rape should be able to get an abortion.  Relatedly, in 2012 when Republican senatorial candidates Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock tried to explain why they believed abortion was only permissible in cases of “legitimate rape” (Akin) or that perhaps it is never permissible because pregnancy resulting from rape is “something God intended” (Mourdock), they ended up costing their party otherwise very winnable Senate seats.

    Republicans, of course, remember 2012 very well and have no interest in reminding the rest of the country of the cringe-inducing debate over how best to define rape.  Sen. Lindsey Graham recently suggested that the party needs to “find a way out of this definitional problem with rape” (although, as Joan Walsh observes, Sen. Graham risks stepping in the same trap as Todd Akin simply by alluding to a “definitional” question regarding rape.)  The revival of the rape definition discussion (most recently prompting philosophical musings by a Utah lawmaker about the ability of unconscious wives to have consensual sex) raises a larger problem for Republicans: It seems they just don’t trust women

  • February 9, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    At Salon, Jenny Kutner reports that the Supreme Court has denied a stay in the Alabama same-sex marriage case.

    Bill Chappell writes for NPR that Alabama courts have begun to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite comments from Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore that courts should ignore the federal court ruling on same-sex marriage.

    Louise Radnofsky, Jess Bravin, and Brent Kendall write in The Wall Street Journal that there are now questions about the standing of the lead plaintiff in King v. Burwell.

    The Constitutional Accountability Center provides an overview of the King v. Burwell amicus briefs that support the government in the case.

    Joseph Shapiro of NPR reports that civil rights attorneys are suing Ferguson over “debtors' prisons” that jail people when the fail to pay fines for minor offenses.

    In The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf discusses how federalism has helped same-sex marriage spread throughout the country.