ACSBlog

  • November 20, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Boer Deng and Dahlia Lithwick report in Slate on the upcoming Texas execution of a profoundly mentally ill man.

    In The Washington Post, Katrina vanden Heuvel provides a hopeful vision of criminal justice system reform.

    In The New York TimesMichael D. Shear previews President Obama's upcoming announcment on his executive action on immigration. 

    Ian Millhiser argues at Think Progress that the Supreme Court has previously said that President Obama has the necessary power to issue his immigration order.

    At Vox, Sarah Kliff profiles Michael Cannon, the ardent Obamacare opponent who has led the new legal attack on the law. 

    Mychal Denzel Smith writes for The Nation that a failure to indict Darren Wilson will not stop the movement against police violence in the United States.

  • November 19, 2014

    by Katie O’Connor

    Throughout this week, individuals and organizations around the country observe Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people and to address the issues these communities face. As part of that effort, ACS has released a new Issue Brief, “The Transgender Tipping Point: An Overview for the Advocate,” in which Dr. Jillian T. Weiss surveys the laws affecting the transgender community and offers guidance to advocates who seek to expand the legal protections provided to transgender people.

    There are approximately 700,000 transgender people in the United States, but until very recently they have been considered strangers to the law. For decades, courts consistently denied protections against discrimination for transgender people. It was not until 1989, in the case of Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, that the U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged that gender stereotyping constitutes unlawful sex discrimination. Since then, advocates have used laws prohibiting sex discrimination to protect people against discrimination based on transgender status, and courts have slowly become receptive to such cases.

    More recently, cities, states and the federal government have begun to explicitly protect transgender people against discrimination in the areas of employment, education, housing, health care and marriage, among others. Laws that once prohibited discrimination based on sex, race or religion have been amended to protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression.

  • November 19, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Simon Lazarus argues at The New Republic that supporters of the Affordable Care Act are inadvertently recycling conservative arguments when defending the healthcare law against the latest legal challenge.

    At The Economist’s Democracy in America blog, Steve Mazie considers empathy on the Supreme Court. He argues that their “small and privileged” circles limit their perspectives.

    Stephanie Mencimer discusses the Alabama redistricting cases for Mother Jones, arguing that the state that helped gut the Voting Rights Act is now using it to justify racial gerrymandering.

    Oliver Roeder of FiveThirtyEight explains why it is so difficult to predict Supreme Court rulings.

    At CNN, Ed O’Keefe reports on Justice Samuel Alito’s recent remarks about the press and criticisms of the Court’s lack of diversity. 

  • November 18, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    On the Melissa Harris-Perry Show, Janai Nelson and Amy Howe consider the new Affordable Care Act challenge and how Justice Scalia could be the deciding factor.

    Leslie Griffin writes at Hamilton & Griffin on Rights on how the recent opinion of Judge Cornelia Pillard of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in Priests for Life v. HHS explains why women’s equality is not a radical idea.

    Reuben Guttman writes in the International Business Times that the U.S. midterm elections were all about money but had very little substance.

    In The Washington Post, Andrea Peterson looks at the right of citizens to record the police.

    Geoffrey R. Stone argues in the Huffington Post that Senate should approve the USA Freedom Act in order to address the issues raised by the NSA’s surveillance program.

  • November 17, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Reuben A. Guttman, Director, Grant & Eisenhofer; Member, ACS Board of Directors

    *This post originally appeared on The Global Legal Post.

    The United States Chamber of Commerce, a few academics and some media pundits have their lists of cases arguably supporting the proposition that people will sue over anything and hence the need for tort reform to prevent so called 'frivolous litigation.' Out of the countless number of cases filed each year in United States federal and state courts, the tort reformers love to harp on the suit brought by the woman against McDonalds for serving hot coffee and the class action now pending against Subway for allegedly misrepresenting the size of its advertised foot-long sandwiches.    

    Golden oldies

    Since the tort reformers seem to keep dwelling on the same few cases, it might be worth mentioning a few oldies but goodies which have eluded their attention. First, there is the “classroom kick case” where an elementary school child was sued for kicking another student on the knee.  This heinous event occurred in a classroom. The court allowed the case to go forward, holding that if the offending kicker had made his offensive contact on the playground, the kick might have been permissible.

    Then there is the “falling scale case” involving a man on a railroad platform; running to jump on a train, he was pulled on board by a conductor.  Struggling to board the moving rail car, the man dropped a package containing fireworks; the fireworks exploded, knocking a scale down at the end of the platform.  The scale fell on another man who sued the railroad!