November 2017

  • November 27, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Paul Bland, Executive Director, Public Justice

    It has become common knowledge in Washington that, if you want to bury bad news, the best time to do so is on a Friday afternoon, or over a holiday weekend. So it is especially telling that, when it came time to strike at one of the most effective agencies in the federal government, the Trump Administration chose a two-for and announced its plans for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Friday evening over Thanksgiving weekend. While most of the country was (the White House hoped) distracted by black Friday sales and family gatherings, President Trump announced he had installed Mick Mulvaney – who once referred to the CFPB as a “sad sick joke” – as acting director of the agency. The move is just the latest in a long line of Presidential appointments designed to dismantle government agencies from the inside by placing their fiercest critics in charge of their work. But Trump’s move at the CFPB is probably illegal, politically risky, and could backfire in a big way.

  • November 27, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, Samuel Weiss Faculty Scholar and founding director of the Center for Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at Penn State Law - University Park

    *This piece was originally posted on Medium

    Witness Fatiha Elgharib, who has lived in Ohio for more than two decades, serves as primary caregiver to a United States citizen child suffering from Down Syndrome, is married to the breadwinner, and faces imminent deportation on November 27. Fatiha became a target of immigration following her fight and support of her husband during the course of NSEERS –a Muslim registration program enacted after the attacks of 9/11. Fatiha’s story highlights the ongoing residual impact of NSEERS and raises important questions about the legitimacy of using a now defunct and ill-conceived policy to generate new deportations.

  • November 27, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Leah Aden, LDF Senior Counsel

    *This piece was originally posted on Medium.

    In 2020, the federal government will undertake the monumental and important task of attempting to count each person residing within our country’s borders. An exercise that has taken place every 10 years, since 1790, and is mandated by the U.S. Constitution, it cannot be overstated how important the Census is to the well-functioning, representative democracy that our country strives to be. The Black community that the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF), where I work, serves, has a lot to lose if they, like other communities of color, are not counted fairly and accurately in the 2020 Census.

  • November 17, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Chris Edelson, assistant professor of government, American University School of Public Affairs

    For much of American history, legal rules and cultural norms have deemed women unworthy of trust or responsibility.  The law often treated women as children, incapable of carrying out adult duties. Women did not have the right to vote until 1920. It took until 1961 for the Supreme Court to strike down laws automatically excluding women from jury duty.   Until 1979, state laws made it legally impossible for a husband to rape his wife. In the early 19th century, the doctrine of “coverture” provided that a married woman did not have legal status separate from her husband.  In the eyes of the law, married women were not their own person.  Women were barred—by law or by practice—from professions like law, medicine, and politics.

    We like to think those days are long behind us, that women are no longer second-class citizens relegated to a separate, lesser sphere. But it may be difficult, especially for men, to recognize the ways in which significant problems linger.

  • November 17, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Paul Gordon, Senior Legislative Counsel, People For the American Way

    *This piece was originally posted by People For the American Way

    Chuck Grassley wrote this about blue slips in the Des Moines Register in 2015:

    For nearly a century, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee has brought nominees up for committee consideration only after both home-state senators have signed and returned what’s known as a “blue slip.” This tradition is designed to encourage outstanding nominees and consensus between the White House and home-state senators. Over the years, Judiciary Committee chairs of both parties have upheld a blue-slip process, including Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, my immediate predecessor in chairing the committee, who steadfastly honored the tradition even as some in his own party called for its demise. I appreciate the value of the blue-slip process and also intend to honor it.

    It turns out that only applies to a Democratic president’s nominees. On Thursday, Politico reported that Chuck Grassley is ditching the longstanding Senate blue slip policy and will be holding a hearing for David Stras, even though Stras does not have the support of both of his home state senators. Grassley laid out his justification for this seismic shift in policy in an op-ed in The Hill yesterday. An earlier PFAW post explained how Grassley’s comparison to the 2013 filibuster rules change made no sense. But that’s just one of the many holes in his argument.