ACSBlog

  • August 11, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Julie Ebenstein, Staff Attorney, Voting Rights Project, American Civil Liberties Union

    *This post is part of ACSblog’s symposium regarding the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    Just days before the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, we completed a three-week trial challenging North Carolina’s sweeping anti-voter law. 

    In 2013, soon after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act - and with it, the preclearance protections of Section 5 - North Carolina passed an election law shocking in its lack of a valid purpose and its extensive abridgement of citizens’ right to vote.  The challenged provisions of the law reduced the number of days for early voting, eliminated same-day-registration, and prohibited out-of-precinct Election Day voting.  Cumulatively, the law is one of the most repressive elections bills seen in decades. The law exemplifies a “second generation” barrier to voting.  It created broad, structural impediments to electoral participation, in part on the basis of race, and will likely impact hundreds of thousands of voters in the upcoming presidential election.

    In the pre-2013 world, the law would not likely have survived Section 5 preclearance, and thus, would never have been implemented.  But the absence of Section 5’s protection has created a severe disadvantage for voters challenging state’s vote denial measures. Our lawsuit, filed the day the law was implemented, illustrates some of the obstacles to protecting voting rights in the post-Shelby era.

    Section 2’s prohibition on racial discrimination is one of the remaining tools to protect the franchise, but it requires that litigation take place after a law has already gone into effect. As such, the advantages of time and inertia have shifted back to the perpetrators of voter suppression and away from its victims.  Section 2 cases are fact intensive, time-consuming and resource-intensive undertakings.  With constant election cycles, there is no guarantee that the legality of state election laws will be determined before voters are irreversibly disenfranchised.

    The 2014 federal election provides numerous examples. In late 2014, we saw rapid-fire orders by the U.S. Supreme Court, instructing the Sixth, Fourth, Seventh and Fifth Circuits to put election-related decisions on hold until after the election.  Over the course of three weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court made four determinations that affected voting rights in key federal elections.  On September 29, 2014, the Court stayed an Ohio district court decision, upheld by a Sixth Circuit appeals panel, enjoining the state’s cuts to early voting.  The following week, on October 8, the Court stayed the Fourth Circuit mandate to reinstate same-day registration and out-of-precinct voting, after the district court declined to enjoin the practices.  The next day, the Court vacated the Seventh Circuit’s stay of a Wisconsin district court’s permanent injunction of the state’s strict voter ID law.  On October 18, the Court denied applications to vacate the Fifth Circuit’s stay of a decision enjoining Texas’s voter ID law. 

  • August 11, 2015

    by Jim Thompson

    At The New Republic, Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig argues that federal paid leave legislation is necessary, citing ACS President Caroline Fredrickson’s book Under The Bus, which states that “only 11 percent of the workforce has paid leave.”

    In The Washington Post, Sandhya SomashekharWesley Lowery and Keith L. Alexander write about the disproportionate number of unarmed black men killed in unjust police shootings.

    Michelle Andrews at NPR discusses barriers to contraceptive health care for women in the military, quoting Nancy Duff Campbell, co-president of National Women’s Law Center, who laments this issue given the overall high quality of the military’s health system. 

    In The Huffington Post, Marina Fang reports that Gov. Chris Christie vetoed a bill Monday that would allow transgender individuals in New Jersey to change their birth certificate without undergoing gender reassignment surgery.

     

  • August 10, 2015

    by Jim Thompson

    Manny Fernandez at The New York Times writes about the success of Texans for Public Justice, a public policy group dedicated to fighting political corruption in Texas. The group was founded by Craig McDonald, who provided the keynote address at the 2013 Texas ACS Regional Convening.

    In The Los Angeles Times, Paige St. John reports that California will be the first state in the nation to provide sex reassignment surgery for a transgender inmate.

    Dylan Walsh at The Atlantic explores the collateral consequences attached to juvenile criminal sentences.

    At The American Prospect, Rachel M. Cohen discusses the growing movement to restore voting rights to former prisoners. 

  • August 10, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Tram Nguyen, Co-Executive Director, New Virginia Majority

    *This post is part of ACSblog’s symposium regarding the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    The principle of our democracy rests on the idea that each person has a vote that is cast and counted equally, regardless of who they are or where they come from. Fifty years ago, brave women and men marched across a now infamous bridge in Selma, Alabama, facing violence and risking death, asking only for that simple and fundamental right to vote. Today access to the ballot box is being threatened across the country and the struggle to defend our right to vote is still real.

    Since the Shelby decision eviscerated the protections of the Voting Rights Act for which they fought, emboldened state legislatures across the country, particularly those that were previously covered under pre-clearance requirements, are passing more and more laws making it harder for citizens to vote.

    For years, we in Virginia have been fighting against attacks on our voting rights. Prior to the Shelby decision, we could at least count on the Department of Justice to review proposed voting changes, and we could challenge the laws before they were enacted. Now we are forced to challenge voting restrictions in the courts after they’ve taken effect, which can not only be a costly and lengthy process, but many voters already will have been unable to cast a ballot as a consequence.

    Given the current voting rights landscape, civil rights advocates are getting more creative about how to protect voters from the most negative impacts of such restrictive laws. Across the country, many are looking at ways to work with secretaries of state and other election officials as they adopt regulations to implement these new laws.

    For example, Virginia’s new voter photo ID law went into effect in 2014 without being subject to any sort of review. While the law was passed in 2013, an enactment clause delayed implementation until July 1, 2014, which gave voting rights stakeholders over a year to work with the State Board of Elections on specific regulations. We worked with the State Board of Elections under two different administrations – Governor Bob McDonnell (R) and Governor Terry McAuliffe (D), and ultimately the final regulations had bipartisan support.

  • August 7, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Atiba R. Ellis, Professor of Law, West Virginia University College of Law. Twitter: @atibaellis

    *This post is part of ACSblog’s symposium regarding the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    The cornerstone of our democratic republic is the right to vote. The vote allows “We the People” ultimate say over government. The vote allows “We the People” to reject big-money-funded misinformation, the erosion of fundamental rights, and the degradation of public policy. As the Supreme Court has said for over a century, the right to vote is the most fundamental political right because it is “preservative of all other rights.” 

    To be effective at these (admittedly lofty) goals, we also have to recognize that the diversity of our electorate matters. For government to be legitimate, all citizens should be able to participate. Arbitrary bars to political participation raise questions of the validity of representative bodies. History has shown that in the absence of broad enfranchisement, government only acts for the unrepresentative majority. That majority can (and does) marginalize the minority when it comes to the minority’s status as equal citizens. This describes the majoritarian racial domination that defined the Jim Crow era of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 (the “VRA”), which we celebrate in this symposium, is the Constitution’s weapon against this racial domination.

    This state of racial domination had its roots in Reconstruction. The Reconstruction-era Congress, as I note here, sought specifically to protect the vote of freed slaves. The Republican majority in Congress of the late 1860s feared that terrorist tactics and legalized mischief would dissuade African Americans (an important Republican voting bloc) from the franchise. This Congress passed, and the states ratified, the Fifteenth Amendment that constitutionalized the idea of a right to vote free of racial discrimination.

    But the Reconstruction Congress’s fears came true in the century that followed. Even with the Fifteenth Amendment, our constitutional structure nonetheless relies heavily on states to define and administer the qualifications for voting. The Jim Crow period was created by a the southern states betraying the Fifteenth Amendment through race-neutral yet nonetheless disempowering tactics like poll taxes and literacy tests that crushed black political power.

    Thus, by the time the VRA was passed in 1965 to address these concerns, the democratic legitimacy of the United States was openly questioned. Two Americas existed—a white male America with full civil and political power and a black America where two-thirds of African Americans had been discouraged, dissuaded, and terrorized out of the vote.