ACSBlog

  • November 11, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Paul Krugman of The New York Times criticizes the new Supreme Court challenge to the Affordable Care Act and argues that the challenge is based on an “obvious typo.”

    In The Wall Street Journal, Jess Bravin discusses Justice Stephen Breyer’s comments at on his faith the Jewish Federations of North America convention.

    Jeffrey Rosen argues in The New Republic that this term may decide the legacy of Chief Justice John Roberts.

    In Slate, Richard L. Hasen previews the upcoming oral argument for the Alabama redistricting cases in which the Supreme Court will consider whether gerrymandering in the state was an attempt to disenfranchise black voters. 

  • November 10, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    In the Los Angeles Times, David G. Savage and Timothy M. Phelps argue that President Obama is unlikely to change the ideology of the Supreme Court with the new Republican Senate. ACS President Caroline Fredrickson is quoted in the article.

    Noah Feldman examines the newest challenge to the Affordable Care Act before the Supreme Court this term in Bloomberg View.

    In the Detroit Free Press, David H. Gans argues against the decision of U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jeffrey Sutton that upheld same-sex marriage bands in four states.

    Jessica Eaglin writes at the blog for the Brennan Center for Justice on California’s Proposition 47 and the attempt to slow mass incarceration.

    At The Atlantic¸ Matt Ford explains why the Supreme Court may not have to rule on same-sexmarriage. 

  • November 7, 2014

    by Abbie Kamin, Legal Research & Communications Associate for the Lone Star Project and Field Director for the Campaign Legal Center’s Voter ID Assistance Pilot Program in Harris County, TX.

    Tuesday’s Election was a loss for voting rights throughout the country. While countless citizens could not vote because of the implementation of discriminatory voting laws, one can only hope these experiences in Tuesday’s election will galvanize the civil rights community to push even harder to breath life back into the Voting Rights Act (VRA). Until Congress amends the VRA, costly and time-consuming state-by-state litigation will be the key to protecting the right to vote.

    Discriminatory voting laws have already been enacted in several states via highly restrictive voter photo-ID requirements. Because these restrictive laws are working, effectively preventing many citizens from voting, we will likely see an increase in these types of laws

    We have seen first-hand here in Texas the enactment of suppressive voting measures by our state legislature, leading to separate court findings of intentional discrimination by the State on three different measures: congressional redistricting, state senate redistricting, and voter photo ID (SB 14). Texas has been at the forefront of recent efforts to discriminate against minority voters.

  • November 7, 2014

    by Caroline Fredrickson, President, American Constitution Society for Law and Policy. Follow her on Twitter @crfredrickson. This piece originally appeared on The Huffington Post.

    Many may despair -- believing the next two years in Washington will be a long slog of tiresome partisan fights with no positive action to improve the lives of Americans. But moping is the last thing progressives should be about.

    Let's talk judicial nominations. Federal courts are vital -- they decide pressing matters every day, whether they are challenges to employment discrimination, corporate malfeasance, or immigration appeals. Do we just throw our hands up on judicial nominations, buying into a lazy argument that nothing much can be done now with a Senate controlled by Republicans? There likely are many important policy matters that will be shelved. But it doesn't have to be that way with judicial nominations. On this front there's work to be done and it can be achieved with an energetic attitude -- not apathy.

    There are 64 vacancies on the federal bench and if we give up on the federal courts that number will spike and we'll have judges with outlandish caseloads and Americans with a sluggish, inefficient court system. Part of the Senate's job is to confirm judges to ensure our country has a well-running judicial system. We know all too well that for much of Obama's presidency, Senate Republicans have obstructed the process, slow-walked the president's nominations while arguing everything was just fine. Republican leaders who will take control of the Senate in the New Year are talking about cooperation and working with President Obama, but let's be ready to hold them to their words.

    Some of the current vacancies can and should be filled during the lame-duck session. Democrats in the Senate need to get over the outcome of the midterm elections in quick manner and fill 25 vacancies, which can be done -- with the right attitude. There are 16 judicial nominees who have been approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and are ready for up-or-down votes on the Senate floor. There's no excuse for letting those nominees languish. There are also nine nominees, who have had hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Committee should move those nominations to the Senate floor as soon as possible. This is doable in the lame duck.

    And then the next two years -- again no time for dwelling on what could have been. The Senate Republicans may turn back to their obstructionist ways -- let's hope not. Maybe they'll surprise us on the judicial nominations front and realize this is an area for cooperation. But if not, progressives must be ready to push back and keep up the pressure, reminding as many Americans as possible of the great importance our judicial system is to a well-functioning democracy.

  • November 7, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Robert Barnes reports for The Washington Post on the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit to uphold bans on same-sex marriage. According to SCOTUSblog, the ACLU has announced that it will be filing for Supreme Court review right away.

    Chris Geidner of Buzzfeed reports that U.S. District Court Judge Ortrie Smith has ruled Missouri’s ban on same-sex marriage to be unconstitutional. 

    In The Atlantic, Olga Khazan explains why personhood amendments continue to fail throughout the country.

    Steven Mazie writes for The Economist about the oral argument for Yates. V. United States, colloquially known as the “fish case.”

    The National Constitution Center provides a podcast featuring Eugene Kontorovich, Michael Ramsey, and Jeffrey Rosen discussing the oral argument for Zivotofsky v. Kerry, the Jerusalem passport case.

    At the blog for Alliance for Justice, Tom Devine writes about Department of Homeland Security v. MacLean, a case that “will have fundamental consequences for whistleblowers and for the country.”