ACSBlog

  • November 14, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Christopher Kang, ACS Board member and former Deputy Counsel to President Obama

    *This piece originally ran on Huffington Post

    On May 8, 2017, President Trump announced that he intended to nominate Magistrate Judge Terry Moorer to serve as a district judge in the Middle District of Alabama. This nomination would have been President Trump’s first African American judicial nominee, and it’s likely no coincidence that it was announced on the same day as Kevin Newsom for an Alabama-based seat on the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Alabama has never had an African American circuit court judge, and Newsom replaced President Obama’s African American nominee, Judge Abdul Kallon, whom Senators Sessions and Shelby had blocked.

  • November 13, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Debbie Smith, Associate General Counsel for Immigration Law, Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

    Even as the newest Muslim ban works its way through the courts, President Trump has initiated another assault against immigrants by terminating a program providing humanitarian relief to immigrants fleeing civil war and natural disasters. Despite 30 years of Democratic and Republican administrations’ recognition of the importance of continuing this protection, unless Congress intervenes or the administration changes its mind, it is about to end.

    Last Monday, the Acting Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 2,500 Nicaraguans and left in limbo the fate of 57,000 Hondurans who have lived and worked legally in the United States for decades. On Thanksgiving Day, DHS will decide the destiny of 50,000 Haitians who fled the earthquake that decimated their island. In January, DHS will consider whether 200,000 Salvadorans living in the U.S., many for over 20 years, can remain. By the end of 2018, the approximately 350,000 hardworking current TPS beneficiaries will be forced into the shadows and subject to expulsion from the U.S.

  • November 13, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Nicole Huberfeld, Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University

    For a long time, Americans could count on employment to obtain health insurance benefits. The strong link between full-time work and health insurance survived so long that most Americans assume those who work have health insurance, and those who do not have health insurance must not be working. Yet, part-time work has always been very weakly linked to employer-sponsored health insurance benefits, and individuals working in minimum-wage and hourly-paid jobs are much less likely to be offered health insurance as an employment benefit or to be able to afford if offered.

  • November 9, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Jeff Mandell, chair of the Madison Lawyer Chapter and partner, Stafford Rosenbaum LLP, and Craig Mastantuono, chair of the Milwaukee Lawyer Chapter and partner, Mastantuono & Coffee S.C.

    More than 120 lawyers representing 16 different states gathered in Milwaukee last month for ACS’s first-ever National Lawyer Convening. We were honored to serve as co-hosts of this gathering, which was both a great success and a lot of fun. It was exciting to welcome our ACS counterparts from all corners of the nation to Wisconsin, and inspiring to draw on their energy and to learn about how much ACS Lawyer Chapters are doing coast to coast.

  • November 8, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Richard Eisenberg, who served as special counsel to the General Counsel of the Army and the Air Force during the Obama administration, and Alex Wagner, who served as chief of staff to the 22nd Secretary of the Army and is a fellow at the Truman National Security Project.

    Last Monday, a federal district judge blocked enforcement of critical parts of President Trump’s directives banning and purging transgender individuals from serving in the U.S. military. Judge Kollar-Kotelly’s decision in Jane Doe 1, et. al. v. Trump, a case brought in the District of Columbia, is one of at least three pending cases involving challenges to Trump’s order, and highlighted the challenges the government will have in defending Trump’s policy decision and chosen method of implementation. (Another suit, Stone v. Trump, is scheduled for oral argument on November 9 in the District of Maryland.  And a third, Stockman v. Trump, is pending in the Central District of California.)