November 17, 2015

Obama Can and Should Do More to Reduce Gun Violence


Adam Winkler, Constitution, gun violence, Second Amendment

by Adam Winkler, Professor of Law, UCLA Law. Winker is author of Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America.

As the Supreme Court has made clear, the Second Amendment is not an insurmountable barrier to gun control. President Barack Obama should not let the stalemate in Congress be one either. That’s why I, along with numerous other law professors, signed the “Statement of Law Professors on the Constitution and Executive Action to Reduce Gun Violence.” Even in the absence of new federal gun legislation to require every gun buyer to pass a simple background check, the president should continue to seek ways to reduce gun violence through executive action.

Although Obama’s use of executive powers follows longstanding presidential tradition, it has proven controversial. Some have suggested – incorrectly – that executive action on guns would be unauthorized under the Constitution or undermine the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms. In fact, however, the Second Amendment gives the government wide leeway to regulate guns to enhance public safety. Moreover, the Constitution vests Obama with the obligation to insure that congressional mandates “be faithfully executed,” enabling him to take executive action.

Executive action designed, for instance, to clarify existing federal statutes is clearly within the president’s power. The president can, and should, clarify when a gun seller is “engaged in the business” of dealing firearms and thus required to have a federal license. He should also apply the existing federal law barring gun possession by people convicted of misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence to non-married couples and prioritize prosecution of illegal gun buyers. None of these reforms undermine the individual’s right to keep and bear arms for self-defense.  

As with all individual rights, the president should be sure to pursue only those executive actions that do not infringe the Constitution. As the Statement suggests, however, there is much President Obama can still do to reduce gun violence well within the Constitution’s boundaries.