Reva Siegel

  • December 8, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Douglas NeJaime, Professor of Law, Yale Law School and Reva Siegel, Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School

    *This piece was originally published on Take Care Blog.

    Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission is framed narrowly—as a case about whether making a wedding cake is expressive conduct or whether religious individuals should be exempted from laws protecting same-sex couples. But this narrow view of the case misses its real stakes. The Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF, formerly Alliance Defense Fund), which represents Masterpiece Cakeshop, is driving the litigation and many similar cases around the country. ADF is not interested in a narrow resolution to a narrow question; rather, ADF is taking aim at the very legitimacy of LGBT people and legal protections for them.

  • June 6, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece originally appeared on Take Care.

    by Douglas NeJaime, ACS Board of Academic Advisors, Professor of Law and Faculty Director, Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law and Reva Siegel, ACS Board Member and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School.

    Religious exemptions from laws that require doctors to care for patients, employers to pay employees, or store owners to deal with customers in a respectful and nondiscriminatory way can hurt and demean citizens who do not share the claimant’s religious beliefs. Exemption claims of this kind are now spreading under the banner of religious liberty in the culture wars.

    Today, some conservatives are advancing expansive religious exemption claims to stigmatize contraception and restrict women’s access to it. Contraception is “the new abortion.” There are religious conservatives who call certain contraceptive methods “abortifacients,” even in cases where evidence shows that the methods do not operate in ways that satisfy their religious definition of abortifacients. Others oppose all methods of contraception as encouraging “a contraceptive mentality” that separates sex and reproduction.

    These claims about contraception are connected not only to abortion but also to same-sex marriage. As we documented in our 2015 Yale Law Journal article, “Conscience Wars,” many religious conservatives object to contraception, abortion, and same-sex marriage in part because they divert sex and marriage from procreative ends.

  • April 10, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece is part of the ACSblog symposium: "The Future of the U.S. Constitution"

    by Reva Siegel, ACS Board Member and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School

    An aroused public can shape judicial appointments, and shape law.

    Only a few constitutional cases provoke sustained public engagement. But in those few cases where the public is fiercely engaged, judges often respond. Justice Kennedy expressly acknowledged public deliberation about same-sex marriage in Windsor and Obergefell. Justice Scalia, who denounced the living Constitution, wrote an originalist opinion in Heller responding to the claims of living Americans opposed to gun control.

    Mobilization can influence not only the outcome of cases, but even their reasoning. Opponents of health care spread fear of death panels and government-mandated consumption of broccoli, and, in the process, transformed constitutional arguments against the law from “off the wall” to “on the wall.” In Sebelius, the Justices addressed Congress’s power to enact the health care law in opinions that repeatedly discussed vegetables and the importance of protecting individual liberties.

    *   *   *

    Looking back over a half century of abortion conflict, we can see this dynamic in action and imagine new forms it might take.

    For decades, supporters of the abortion right sought protection for women’s health, liberty and equality, while opponents sought protection for unborn life. The Court balanced these claims in Roe’s trimester framework and in Casey’s undue burden standard.

  • April 3, 2013

    by Jeremy Leaming

    Even before the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument in two cases dealing with government discrimination of gay couples who want to get married, a growing chorus of legal scholars and others urged the high court to move slowly. Because, according to these folks, if the justices declare that lesbians and gay men have a constitutionally protected right to wed, a backlash against the marriage equality movement could be unleashed.

    And proof for such a backlash centers on the high court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade opinion, which found that the right of privacy includes the right of women to make their own decisions on abortion. According to proponents of moving slowly on marriage equality, Roe sparked a backlash against growing support of abortion and now we have state after state trying to trample the fundamental right. Therefore the backlash proponents argue that the justices should learn from Roe and avoid handing down a ruling that would end government discrimination against gay couples seeking to wed. This backlash story has been fueled in part by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who while defending the Roe decision, said the Court moved to fast.

    But as an editorial in The New York Times notes, the backlash proponents are basing their argument on a “false reading of politics before and after Roe v. Wade ….” The editorial cites the work of ACS Board Members Linda Greenhouse and Reva Siegel, both teach at Yale Law School, documenting the fact that the fevered opposition to reproductive rights was forming long before the high court handed down Roe.

    In a 2010 interview with ACSblog, highlighting their Before Roe v. Wade book, Greenhouse and Siegel said the documentation they collected for the book showed “that, contrary to the commonly expressed view that it was the Supreme Court and its decision that unleashed a ‘backlash’ against abortion reform, a vigorous counter-movement was forming well before Roe. In the late 1960s, as public support for liberalization surged, the Catholic Church helped organized an anti-abortion movement to oppose liberalization in every state legislature and court considering abortion laws. Strategists for President Nixon’s 1972 re-election then decided to denounce ‘permissive’ abortion laws to attract Catholics from their longtime affiliation with the Democratic Party and court the support of a ‘silent majority.’”

     

  • September 29, 2009
    Starting Friday, Oct. 2, Yale Law School will host a three-day conference focusing on the recent book, The Constitution in 2020. The book was published earlier this year and edited by Yale Law School professors Jack Balkin and Reva Siegel. It includes more than a dozen essays from an array of scholars on constitutional interpretation, citizenship, civil liberties, security, religion, social welfare rights and family.

    A special pre-conference discussion among some of the scheduled participants is being featured on The Constitution in 2020 blog. Some of the professors who have already posted guest items include Richard W. Garnett, Paul Horwitz and Alice Ristroph. Visit the blog frequently for additional posts and to join the discussion.

    For more information on The Constitution in 2020 Conference visit here.