Maura Healy

  • February 22, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Maura Healey, Attorney General of Massachusetts*

    To pay for the hallmarks of a decent middle-class life, American families have found it increasingly necessary to borrow money. We tell our children that a college degree is essential for their success in the modern economy, but few students can afford the ever-increasing costs of higher education without incurring student loans. (1) We extoll the virtues and benefits of homeownership, but the high cost of housing requires most homeowners to have a mortgage loan. (2) As middle-class wages have remained stagnant, consumers have looked to credit to pay for essential expenses like transportation, medical bills, and childcare. As a result, many American households find themselves deeply in debt.

    Too often, these debts have proven to be disastrous. Countless students sought to learn essential job skills and borrowed heavily to do so, but instead became the victims of high-cost, fraudulent, for-profit schools that offered no meaningful vocational training. (3) Homeowners across the country are still grappling with the consequences of the predatory subprime mortgage loans that caused the financial crisis of 2008. (4) While debt may allow some families to succeed, debt cripples the aspirations and ambitions of many others— approximately seventy-seven million Americans have at least one delinquent debt on their credit report. (5) 

    Given the challenges that consumer debt poses to the economic security of so many people, I applaud the Harvard Law & Policy Review for devoting this issue to discussing the rights and obligations of creditors and debtors and to the appropriate policy responses to America’s ongoing struggles with debt.