Marijuana

  • January 16, 2018
    Guest Post

    by Sam Kamin, Vicente Sederberg Professor of Marijuana Law and Policy, The University of Denver Sturm College of Law

    When Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last week that he was rescinding the 2013 Cole Memorandum, marijuana policy was once again back on the national stage. The Cole Memo, issued by the Obama Justice Department, stated that those using, producing, or selling marijuana in compliance with robust state regulations would not be targeted by federal prosecutors. With the Cole Memo gone, there was renewed concern that state-level marijuana law reform could be undone by federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

    The reaction against Sessions’s action was swift. Republican Senator Cory Gardner took to the floor of the Senate, condemning Sessions’s decision as a broken promise. Senator Gardner also announced that that he would block all Justice Department nominations until the Attorney General made good on his pledge to defer to the states on marijuana policy. Others on both sides of the aisle made similar calls on Sessions to respect the will of the voters in the 29 states that made marijuana legally available for at least some adults.

  • January 11, 2018
    Guest Post

    by Alex Kreit, Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law

    It’s been one week since Attorney General Sessions rescinded an Obama-era memo that had effectively ended federal prosecutions of state-legal marijuana businesses. Under the new policy, it is up to individual U.S. Attorneys to decide whether to go after people who comply with state marijuana laws. So far, the new Department of Justice policy has not resulted in any arrests or prosecutions.

    Why did Sessions make this move and why did he wait so long to do it? After one week, marijuana policy watchers are still left scratching their heads.

  • July 29, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    The Burlington Free Press reports on the death of Cheryl Hanna, who was the Vice President for External Relations and Professor of Law at Vermont Law School professor. A noted legal analyst, Professor Hanna was also the faculty adviser to the ACS Student Chapter at Vermont Law School. ACS extends its condolences to her family and friends.

    The New York Times Editorial Board continues its series calling for an end to the government’s failed war on marijuana. In “The Injustice of Marijuana Arrests,” the board states what many legal scholars and others have noted for a long time – arrests for marijuana possession target black men and ruin too many of their lives. The newspaper’s editorial board states:

    The sheer volume of law enforcement resources devoted to marijuana is bad enough. What makes the situation far worse is racial disparity. Whites and blacks use marijuana at roughly the same rates; on average, however, blacks are 3.7 times more likely than whites to be arrested for possession, according to a comprehensive 2013 report by the ACLU.

    Emma Green of The Atlantic discusses the new same-sex marriage ruling in Virginia, and how it differs from other pro-marriage equality rulings in the past.

    Writing for The Constitutional Accountability Center, Doug Kendall praises the Senate’s “nuclear option” to prevent filibusters in federal judicial confirmation hearings, particularly in light of the recent Senate confirmation of Pamela Harris.

    In a piece for the ACLU, Alex Sinha discusses what Edward Snowden’s reports on government surveillance mean for the law, and the new measures lawyers must take to ensure attorney-client privilege remains unbroken.

  • July 28, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    The New York Times is calling for the federal government to repeal laws banning marijuana, saying that as a substance it is less dangerous than alcohol, and the social costs of keeping it illegal are too vast to justify its current legal status. “The social costs of the marijuana laws are vast. There were 658,000 arrests for marijuana possession in 2012, according to the FBI figures, compared with 256,000 for cocaine, heroin and their derivatives. Even worse, the result is racist, falling disproportionately on young black men, ruining their lives and creating new generations of career criminals.”

    Prachi Gupta in a piece for Salon explores the recent federal judge’s ruling that D.C.’s public handgun ban is unconstitutional.

    NPR’s Rebecca Buckwalter-Poza discusses Alabama’s high rate of death penalty sentences, especially in light of recent debate surrounding capital punishment. On MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry,” ACS Vice President of Network Advancement Sarah Knight discussed the recent Arizona death penalty debacle, where it took the state almost two hours to execute a condemned death row inmate. 

    Sarah Kliff at Vox reports on pro-choice legislators using the Supreme Court buffer zone ruling as a guideline for new, safer abortion clinics which can be protected as effectively as possible. On the same “Melissa Harris-Perry” show, ACS’s Sarah Knight joined a discussion about the Supreme Court’s opinion earlier this summer invalidating Massachusetts’ abortion clinic buffer zone law.

  • April 26, 2013

    by Jeremy Leaming

    Despite the rhetoric to move beyond a perpetual “war on drugs” the Obama administration remains mired in the tough-on-drugs mindset and its Justice Department seems befuddled by the states that have legalized small amounts of marijuana for recreational use.

    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report revealing that the administration’s goals set out in 2010 have largely not been met. The report noted that the Office of National Drug Control Policy and other federal agencies established “seven Strategy goals related to reducing illicit drug use and its consequences by 2015.” GAO continued, “As of March 2013,” its “analysis showed that of the five goals for which primary data on results were available, one shows progress and four show no progress.”

    But, as The Huffington Post’s Matt Sledge reports drug czar Gil Kerlikowske, head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy has just released another drug control plan that builds on the policies the GAO has said are not working. More troubling, Sledge notes that the drug office’s budget “still devotes less than half of it funds to treatment and prevention. The GAO found that prevention and treatment programs are ‘fragmented’ across 15 federal agencies.”

    In an April 24 post on its web site, the Office of National Drug Control Policy bemoans “illicit drug use,” claiming “drug-induced overdose deaths now surpass homicides and car crashes as the leading cause of injury or death in America.” It also declares “we cannot arrest or incarcerate our way out of the drug problem.”

    The language from the administration’s drug control office is softer than rhetoric about the “war on drugs,” which the Nixon administration launched with the enactment of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) several decades ago. But the administration’s drug control office is not embracing drug legalization or even any changes to the CSA, such as removing marijuana from the list of drugs deemed as dangerous as say heroin.

    The muddled message from the Obama administration -- not helped by its Justice Department’s silence on how it will respond to Colorado and Washington, where officials are crafting measures to implement and regulate the recreational use of marijuana -- is preserving tough-on-drugs policies.