Justice John Paul Stevens

  • May 6, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    In The AtlanticDavid A. Graham considers whether Marilyn Mosby, the Baltimore City state's attorney, can win the case against the six officers accused of killing Freddie Gray

    At SalonJenny Kutner ​writes that the Texas Senate recently approved a bill that would provide abortion coverage only for "medical emergencies" and does not include any exceptions for rape or incest. 

    Jess Bravin reports in The Wall Street Journal that three senators along with retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens are urging President Obama to release more Guantanamo prisoners.  

    At The Washingotn BladeChris Johnson considers what will happen if the Supreme Court rules against marriage equality and quotes Sarah Warbelow, legal director for the Human Rights Campaign, from the ACS panel discussion on the same-sex marriage cases. 

    The Editorial Board of The Nation argue that "accountability and justice should mean an end to both abusive policing and the secret drone program, which only create more terror."  

    At the New Republic​Spencer Woodman ​discusses how attempts to register minority voters in Georgia resulted in criminal investigations and threats of jail time. 

     
  • April 17, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    At Slate, Cristian Farias argues that the Supreme Court ruling in Heien v. North Carolina has set the stage for more incidents like the Walter Scott shooting.

    At the Text & History Blog of the Constitutional Accountability Center, David H. Gans rebuts the argument that conservatives have been bullied in the same-sex marriage cases.

    Stacy Seicshnaydre in the Huffington Post urges the Supreme Court to uphold the disparate impact cause of action available under the Fair Housing Act.

    In The New York Times, ACS Board of Directors member Linda Greenhouse considers Justice John Paul Stevens life at the Supreme Court in light of his upcoming ninety-fifth birthday.

    Cameron Miculka writes in the Guam Pacific Daily News about the community reaction to the Guam attorney general’s decision to issue same-sex marriage licenses in the territory.

    Dan Morse and Robert Barnes report in The Washington Post on Chief Justice John Roberts’ appearance for jury duty in a Maryland court this week.

  • May 7, 2014

    As controversy continues to surround Oklahoma’s botched execution of Clayton Lockett, a “bipartisan panel of legal experts have urged sweeping changes in what it calls the ‘deeply flawed’ administration of capital punishment.” Erik Eckholm at The New York Times reports on the panel’s proposal for execution by single-dose injections. At The Week, Andrew Cohen explains why either John Paul Stevens or Sandra Day O’Connor should lead Oklahoma’s  investigation.
     
    Writing for The New York Times, Justin Gillis reports on a new study which shows “with water growing scarcer in dry regions, torrential rains increasing in wet regions, and heat waves becoming more common and more severe…the effects of human-induced climate change are being felt in every corner of the United States.”
     
    As the Supreme Court nears the end of its term, many will be focusing on the justices’ ruling in high stakes securities class action and software patent cases. Lawrence Hurley at Reuters has the story.
     
    At The Life of the Law, Katherine Thompson writes to President Obama about immigration law and the struggles facing same-sex couples—and he writes back. 

     

     

  • April 14, 2014

     
    The Justice Department has accused the Albuquerque Police Department of “a pattern or practice of use of excessive force that routinely violated people’s constitutional rights.” Fernanda Santos at The New York Times reports on the 16-month investigation which found that “too often, the officers kicked, punched and violently restrained nonthreatening people … many of whom suffered from mental illnesses,” while other victims “were disabled, elderly or drunk.”
     
    Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit heard oral arguments in Kitchen v. Herbert, a case challenging Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage. State officials filed an appeal after the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah held the ban to be unconstitutional last December. Writing for Jost on Justice, Kenneth Jost comments on the legal and “unmistakably personal” implications of the case.
     
    The Federal Trade Commission won an important victory in a case that challenged its authority to “regulate data security under the FTC Act.” Daniel Solove at Concurring Opinions breaks down Federal Trade Commission v. Wyndham Worldwide Corporation, et al.
     
    In a study conducted by the Center for American Progress, Jenny DeMonte and Robert Hanna reveal that in some areas, impoverished students are “less likely to receive highly effective teaching.” In their report, DeMonte and Hanna provide ways to combat this troubling inequality.  
     
    In an excerpt from Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution highlighted in The Washington Post, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens discusses the recent shooting massacres, the influence of the National Rifle Association and “the five extra words that can fix the Second Amendment.”
  • April 8, 2014

    Writing for Verdict, Michael C. Dorf compares last week’s decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission with the political philosophy of fictional House of Cards majority whip Francis Underwood to reveal “a Court with an utterly benighted view of politics.” At CAC’s Text & History Blog, Brianne Gorod notes how Chief Justice John Roberts’ ruling in McCutcheon is inconsistent with his stated beliefs as a judge on the U. S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
     
    While the Affordable Care Act remains “too entrenched, among consumers and providers, either to fail on its own or be dispatched by legislative ‘repeal,’” its opponents continue to resist the law, bringing lawsuits that could “wreak havoc beyond the exchanges.” Writing for The New Republic, Simon Lazarus explains what needs to be done to counter these challenges.
     
    The Obama administration continues to face criticism for its deportation of immigrants living in the country illegally. Ginger Thompson and Sarah Cohen of The New York Times reveal how an “examination of the administration’s record shows how the disconnect evolved between the president’s stated goal of blunting what he called the harsh edge of immigration enforcement and the reality that has played out.”
     
    On Monday, the Supreme Court decided not to grant certiorari in a case asking whether a business can “refuse to serve gay and lesbian customers.” Lyle Denniston at SCOTUSblog breaks down Elane Photography v. Willock and other orders from the high court.
     
    Andrew Cohen at The Atlantic reviews former Supreme Court Justice John Paul StevensSix Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, and highlights the justice’s change of heart on the constitutionality of capital punishment.