Douglas NeJaime

  • December 8, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Douglas NeJaime, Professor of Law, Yale Law School and Reva Siegel, Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School

    *This piece was originally published on Take Care Blog.

    Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission is framed narrowly—as a case about whether making a wedding cake is expressive conduct or whether religious individuals should be exempted from laws protecting same-sex couples. But this narrow view of the case misses its real stakes. The Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF, formerly Alliance Defense Fund), which represents Masterpiece Cakeshop, is driving the litigation and many similar cases around the country. ADF is not interested in a narrow resolution to a narrow question; rather, ADF is taking aim at the very legitimacy of LGBT people and legal protections for them.

  • June 6, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece originally appeared on Take Care.

    by Douglas NeJaime, ACS Board of Academic Advisors, Professor of Law and Faculty Director, Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law and Reva Siegel, ACS Board Member and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School.

    Religious exemptions from laws that require doctors to care for patients, employers to pay employees, or store owners to deal with customers in a respectful and nondiscriminatory way can hurt and demean citizens who do not share the claimant’s religious beliefs. Exemption claims of this kind are now spreading under the banner of religious liberty in the culture wars.

    Today, some conservatives are advancing expansive religious exemption claims to stigmatize contraception and restrict women’s access to it. Contraception is “the new abortion.” There are religious conservatives who call certain contraceptive methods “abortifacients,” even in cases where evidence shows that the methods do not operate in ways that satisfy their religious definition of abortifacients. Others oppose all methods of contraception as encouraging “a contraceptive mentality” that separates sex and reproduction.

    These claims about contraception are connected not only to abortion but also to same-sex marriage. As we documented in our 2015 Yale Law Journal article, “Conscience Wars,” many religious conservatives object to contraception, abortion, and same-sex marriage in part because they divert sex and marriage from procreative ends.