Dana Milbank

  • September 15, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Lyle Denniston of SCOTUSblog argues that the ban on same-sex marriage in Arizona is likely to fall soon.

    In The New York Times, Jeremy W. Peters writes about how the partisan balance of the federal courts has shifted in little more than a decade.

    Jeff John Roberts of Gigaom questions what tech firm control over newsrooms means for public interest battles.

    Emily Bazelon writes in Slate that the accompanied minor crisis at the border is forcing legal experts to consider how the U.S. should determine grants of asylum.

    In The Washington Post, Dana Milbank argues that the future grand jury trial in Ferguson is likely to be a farce given the prosecutor’s attitude toward the case. 

  • June 28, 2013
    Humor

    by John Schachter

    Article III of the U.S. Constitution plainly states that members of the Supreme Court “shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour.” For so-called textualists or strict constructionists who believe in using the actual words of the Constitution to interpret its meaning the time has come to kick Justice Samuel Alito off the bench.

    I have a nearly 14-year-old son – also named Samuel, by the way. Ever since he was toddler, we have told him to show respect for his peers, teammates, friends and teachers, for young and old alike. (Even for his parents, hard as that message is to sell.) When he scoffs at others’ opinions, interrupts those sharing their thoughts or – most annoying of all – rolls his eyes when someone is speaking, we reprimand him for his “bad behavior.”

    Justice Alito apparently never learned this lesson. As a result his behavior on the Court (and sometimes outside it) is anything but exemplary. It seems that it’s not just his opinions and votes that are offensive, but that his treatment of colleagues and other esteemed leaders is equally odious.

    The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank chronicled Alito’s rude treatment of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg during the Court’s closing sessions, as he “visibly mocked” her during her reading of a dissent to one of his right-wing opinions. His eye-rolling also caught the attention of The Atlantic’s Garrett Epps, who called the behavior a “mini-tantrum” that “brought gasps from more than one person in the audience.”

    Milbank reported that Alito’s insolence extends beyond his ocular offenses aimed at Ginsburg. Days before as both Justices Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor read from opinions in other cases Alito “demonstrated his disdain” for his colleagues by glowering, shaking his head and (it must be his signature move) rolling his eyes.

    Of course, all of this bad behavior comes on the heels of Alito silently yet snippily scolding President Obama during the 2010 State of the Union address when the president had the audacity to criticize the Court’s decision in Citizens United.

    When it comes to bad behavior, it doesn’t take an experienced jurist or constitutional scholar to “know it when [we] see it.” (It’s a lot easier to define than pornography.) So for those who believe in the words and text of the Constitution, let’s hear your call for Alito’s removal – or let’s hear your contorted reasoning why not.

    But you better not simply roll your eyes.

  • April 27, 2012

    by Jeremy Leaming

    For what feels like decades, reporters, pundits, and ideologues, mostly on the right, but some on the left, have lauded Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia for his wit, pointed oral argument questioning and allegedly brilliant writing. But those plaudits, in light of the justice’s performances during oral argument in cases challenging health care reform and Arizona’s racial profiling law, are wobbly at best, bordering on delusional.

    In reality Scalia increasingly has difficulty, as The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank recently noted, containing his rabid partisanship. It’s unbecoming. During the Affordable Care Act oral argument it appeared, at times, that his only preparation involved reading right-wing blogs railing about the slippery slope to regulations mandating purchases of broccoli and gym memberships. At oral argument in Arizona v. U.S., regarding challenges to several portions of the state’s anti-immigrant law, Scalia “left no doubt from the start that he was a champion of the Arizona crackdown and that he would verbally lacerate anybody who felt otherwise,” Mibank wrote.

    Milbank continued, “Scalia’s tart tongue has been a fixture on the bench for years, but as the justices venture this year into highly political areas such as health-care reform and immigration, the divisive and pugilistic style of the senior associate justice is very much defining the public image of the Roberts Court.”

    And it’s not a flattering image. Not only does Scalia come off as a ringleader of right-wing hacks in robes, he increasingly comes off as clueless or heartless. During the health care oral argument, questions from Scalia and some of the other right-wing justices prompted a string of commentators to question whether the justices understood the health care insurance market.