Brad Smith

  • January 19, 2018
    Guest Post

    by Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

    *This piece was originally posted on Microsoft On the Issues

    Something extraordinary happened in Washington, D.C., yesterday.

    Members of Congress took the same position as members of the European Parliament. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce approvingly quoted a statement by the European Commission. Business groups and big companies agreed with consumer and privacy advocates. Faculty from Harvard joined with professors from Princeton. Professors from Duke joined rivals from the University of North Carolina, while those at Berkeley sided with Stanford. And Fox News agreed with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • December 19, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

    *This piece was originally posted on Microsoft On The Issues
     
    Across the country, recurring news stories about sexual harassment have opened our collective eyes to a critical problem right under our nose: sexual harassment. As many rightly have said, the #MeToo movement has created a national reckoning. As we’ve talked with and listened to our own employees at Microsoft, we’ve realized that it also needs to be more than this. It needs national reflection.
  • October 16, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

    *This piece originally appeared on Microsoft on the Issues on October 16, 2017.

    In July 2016, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit agreed with Microsoft that U.S. federal or state law enforcement cannot use traditional search warrants to seize emails of citizens of foreign countries that are located in data centers outside the United States.  Today, the Supreme Court granted the Department of Justice’s petition to review Microsoft’s victory.  This is an important case that people around the world will watch.  We will continue to press our case in court that the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) – a law enacted decades before there was such a thing as cloud computing – was never intended to reach within other countries’ borders.

  • September 7, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

    This piece was originally posted on Microsoft On The Issues

    We are deeply disappointed by the administration’s decision today to rescind protection under the program for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). As we said last week, we believe this is a big step back for our entire country.

    The question for individuals, employers and the country is what we do now.

  • June 28, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece originally appeared on Microsoft on the Issues on June 23, 2017.

    by Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

    Today the U.S. Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to reconsider a legal decision, in a case brought by Microsoft, which found that U.S. warrants cannot be unilaterally applied to email in other countries. It seems backward to keep arguing in court when there is positive momentum in Congress toward better law for everyone. The DOJ’s position would put businesses in impossible conflict-of-law situations and hurt the security, jobs, and personal rights of Americans.

    DOJ’s request follows House and Senate hearings earlier this month which demonstrated strong support for modernizing the 31-year-old law at issue in the case and implementing updated data-sharing treaties with our allies. Those in agreement include members of Congress, the business community, academic researchers, our international allies and the Justice Department itself. In fact, Congress has already taken steps to address this important issue and DOJ has already negotiated the first new international agreement. Last year, the International Communications Privacy Act (“ICPA”) was introduced by Sens. Orrin Hatch and Christopher Coons and Reps. Tom Marino and Suzan DelBene to create a modern legal framework. We understand the sponsors may reintroduce the bill after incorporating input from a range of stakeholders. These solutions consider the current needs of law enforcement, the realities of modern technology and the application of people’s traditional rights in today’s world.

    As Judge Gerard E. Lynch stated in his concurring opinion in our case, “Although I believe that we have reached the correct result as a matter of interpreting the statute before us, I believe even more strongly that the statute should be revised, with a view to maintaining and strengthening the Act’s privacy protections, rationalizing and modernizing the provisions permitting law enforcement access to stored electronic communications and other data where compelling interests warrant it, and clarifying the international reach of those provisions after carefully balancing the needs of law enforcement (particularly investigations addressing the most serious kinds of transnational crime) against the interests of other sovereign nations.”