ACSBlog

  • May 1, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Rena Steinzor and Thomas McGarity, past presidents and founders of the Center for Progressive Reform. Steinzor is a professor at the University of Maryland Carey Law School, and McGarity is a professor at the University of Texas Law School. Steinzor is author of Why Not Jail? Industrial Catastrophes, Corporate Malfeasance, and Government Inaction. McGarity is author of Freedom to Harm: The Lasting Legacy of the Laissez Faire Revival.

    With the announcement that GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra received the outsized compensation of $16.2 million in 2014, what should have been a year of humiliation and soul-searching for that feckless automaker instead ended on a disturbingly self-satisfied note.  Purely from a public relations perspective, Barra worked hard for her money.  Appearing repentant, sincere, and downcast, she persuaded star-struck members of Congress that the company was committed to overhauling a culture characterized by what she called the “GM shrug,” loosely translated as avoiding individual accountability at all costs.  Even as she blinked in the television lights, GM fought bitter battles behind the scenes to block consumer damage cases and exploit corporate tax loopholes.

    Largely on the basis of her political adeptness, Barra has been taking victory laps in the business press, hailed as the rare (female) CEO who has led her corporation out of a morass that could happen to anyone.  This performance and the accolades it inspired provide a troubling coda to what was a destructive year for American drivers.  Dubbed “the year of the recall,” automakers recalled an unprecedented 64 million vehicles ‒ about one in five cars on the road; GM led with 26 million of this total.

    To restore justice to GM’s beleaguered customers – and the scores of families who lost loved ones in crashes caused by the defective switch – we can only hope that the Justice Department’s criminal investigation of the company and its senior executives results in prosecutions that could offset the unjust favors the legal system is already prepared to bestow.

  • May 1, 2015

    by Paul Guequierre

    Earlier this week the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, the consolidated marriage equality cases. It is a critical case in the fight for equal rights for LGBT Americans and the nation now waits to hear if marriage equality will soon be the law of the land (my prediction is it will be).

    The Supreme Court finally decided to take a marriage equality case after declining several when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled a marriage ban constitutional. This was the circuit split we had all been waiting for. But before the Sixth Circuit ruling, every other marriage ban before a federal court had been knocked down. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit was no exception, striking down three separate marriage bans last year and making marriage equality a reality throughout the circuit. Yet there is one governor who is pulling a Roy Moore.

    After a lesbian couple filed a lawsuit after being denied a marriage license, Guam Attorney General Elizabeth Barrett-Anderson last month issued an opinion that the territory should follow the rulings of the Ninth Circuit (which it falls under) and should immediately start issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Seems like an open and closed issue, right? Enter Republican governor Eddie Calvo.

    Calvo ordered the Public Health Department, the territory agency responsible for issuing marriage licenses, to hold tight. Until his legal team has the chance to do its own legal research, no marriage licenses will be issued to same-sex couples. And he continues to punt. He has asked for the legislature to take up the issue, but he has not said he wouldn’t veto a marriage equality bill. He has asked for a public referendum, putting the rights of a minority up to the will of the majority, not to mention engaging in a costly endeavor only weeks or months before the Supreme Court rules on the issue once and for all.  

    So what are loving and committed same-sex couples on the island supposed to do? It would appear they have two options, simply wait or travel to a marriage equality state (by the way the distance a couple would have to travel to get married is 3,950 miles).

    Governor Calvo is defying the Ninth Circuit. He is stalling. When the marriage equality story is written – and it will be soon – Governor Calvo will be on the wrong side of history. Biba Guam and Hafa Adai, marriage equality. 

  • May 1, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    On Thursday, President Obama announced five new judicial nominations: Todd Sunhwae Kim to be an Associate Judge of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and Julie Helene Becker, William Ward Nooter, Robert A. Salerno, and Steven M. Wellner to be Associate Judges of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.  

    Senator Chuck Grassley, the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, refuses to admit his part in the delays on judicial nominees. As the Alliance for Justice explains, the senator has claimed that Republicans should take credit for nominees confirmed last congress, but has denied any responsibility for two months of Loretta Lynch’s confirmation wait that occurred in the same time period.

    More troubling still, the senator’s comments at the National Press Club on Monday indicate that he may wish to shut down judicial confirmations entirely. Senator Grassley stated, “Come July of 2015, probably they’ll be cut off and not approving any.”

    The blog of People for the American Way illustrates the problem with cutting off judicial confirmations in July. Not only could this move continue to swell the number of judicial vacancies, but it also comes at a time when the nominees that have presented are being considered at a glacial pace.

    There are currently 55 vacancies, and 23 are now considered judicial emergencies. There are 17 pending nominees. For more information see judicialnominations.org.

  • May 1, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    Matt Ford of The Atlantic discusses the oral arguments in Glossip v. Gross, the first lethal injection challenge before the Supreme Court in nearly a decade.

    Mark Berman reports in The Washington Post on a state Supreme Court justice who stepped down in protest of the death penalty. 

    At the New Republic, Brianne Gorod considers how recent decisions show that Chief Justice John Roberts may be unexpectedly drifting to the left.

    Sasha Abramsky writes at The Nation that the MacArthur Foundation’s $75 million pledge to criminal justice reform shows the strength of the political momentum behind reform efforts.

    At Jacobin Magazine, Shawn Gude argues that “grinding poverty and neglect wrought by capital” explains the unrest in Baltimore.

    On the Docket, the blog of the George Washington Law Review, features insight into recent Supreme Court cases. Alan Morrison discusses how equity trumps jurisdiction in United States v. Wong. Stephen A. Saltzburg considers Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s opinion in Rodriguez v. United States. And Emily Hammond writes on Oneok v. Learjet

  • April 30, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Justin Pidot, Assistant Professor, University of Denver Sturm College of Law; Member, Board of Directors, ACS Colorado Lawyer Chapter; Faculty Advisor, University of Denver Sturm College of Law ACS Student Chapter.

    With Michigan v. EPA, the Supreme Court continues its tradition of reviewing the Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to regulate under the Clean Air Act. Last year, the Court considered, and partially invalidated, a rule regulating greenhouse gas emissions. This year, the Court considers a rule EPA issued to reduce mercury and other hazardous air pollutants from power plants ― which we have long recognized release significant amounts of heavy metals and other toxins into the air.

    In 1990, Congress gave EPA the task of studying hazardous emissions from power plants and deciding whether to regulate those emissions to protect public health. Twenty-five years later, EPA finally decided to take up this task. A coalition of states and industry groups challenged EPA’s regulation.

    The Supreme Court heard oral argument in the case brought by that coalition on March 25, 2015, and it will likely release a decision within about a month.  Several commenters, like Lyle Denniston at SCOTUSblog and Catherine O’Neill at CPRBlog, have suggested that the outcome is difficult to predict, although a slight majority of participants in “Fantasy SCOTUS,” a platform that allows individuals to predict the outcomes of Supreme Court cases, believe that EPA will win.

    After reading the transcript of the argument, I am left feeling pessimistic for EPA. While the outcome of the case is far from clear, my sense is that the power industry may continue to evade regulation for a while longer.