ACSBlog

  • May 15, 2015

    by Nanya Springer

    A week after its release, ACS President Caroline Fredrickson’s book, Under the Bus: How Working Women Are Being Run Over, is receiving accolades for its examination of the legal and cultural obstacles faced by women in the workplace, and it is resonating with women who cannot advance at work by simply “leaning in,” or “opting out.”

    Linda Tirado of Elle explains, “Someone once asked me what I thought about ‘lean-in feminism.’ I told her that it was meant for wealthy women, not for women like me. Work, as I've always understood it, isn't a gentle, swaying sort of thing. It's not full of opportunities for musing on work/life-balance. It's where you go, when they let you, to make whatever money they'll give you in exchange for your labor.” 

    These sentiments are echoed by Sheila Bapat at Feministing, who writes, “Fredrickson takes ownership of the problematic ‘lean in’ and ‘having it all’ frameworks and the class chasms they reveal,” adding that the book “applies both data and personal narratives to show that most women in the US are working in low-wage, unpredictable, insecure, and exploitative environments ― even though many women are the sole breadwinners for their families.”

    For more insight into the book and its analysis of how today’s labor laws exclude women workers, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation and discrimination, take a look at the resources below.

    Financial Exploitation of Women in the Workplace Is the Canary in the Coal Mine, Truthout

    Congress’ Despicable War on Working Women: How Our Warped Laws Perpetuate Discrimination, Salon

    Book review, Sheila Bapat, Feministing

    Book review, Linda Tirado, Elle Magazine

    Book review, Samantha Michaels, Mother Jones

    Book review, Kirkus

    Lean In or Opt-Out? Or How About We Change the Law?, The WorkLife Hub (podcast)

    Interview, Uprising with Sonali (video)

    Interview, Thom Hartmann Program (video)

    Economic Policy Institute panel discussion, Are Working Women Leaning In or Being Run Over? (video)

    And visit the Under The Bus Facebook page to join in the discussion.

    [Image created by Elle]

     

  • May 15, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    Matthew Menendez considers at the blog for the Brennan Center for Justice what happens with judicial elections after the ruling in Williams-Yulee v. Florida Bar.

    At The Atlantic, Danah Boyd and Alex Rosenblat argue that the enthusiasm for police-worn body cameras is premature.

    Elias Isquith considers at Salon how the way the public discusses crime may make the problem worse.

    Suzy Khimm writes in The New Republic that child care is an economic problem that the government could help fix with subsidizes for American families.

    The New York Times Editorial Board explains how a House bill that would ban virtually all abortions 20 weeks or more after fertilization is based on bogus arguments.

  • May 15, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    This week the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published a letter from Senator Pat Toomey that insists he is not to blame for the delays on the consideration of District Judge L. Felipe Restrepo for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. But it seems clear that the Senator has taken few steps to get the Judiciary Committee to take up Restrepo’s nomination, as the Text & History Blog of the Constitutional Accountability Center explains.

    Few are buying Toomey’s assertion that he is not delaying action on Restrepo’s nomination. The vacancy that Restrepo would fill is currently a judicial emergency, but The Huffington Post reports that it remains unclear when he will get a hearing.

    In other news, a vacancy on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit may finally have a nominee after sitting vacant for more than five years. As the Constitutional Accountability Center reports, Senator Tammy Baldwin submitted the names of eight possible candidates to the White House this week.

    There are currently 56 vacancies, and 24 are now considered judicial emergencies. There are 17 pending nominees. For more information see judicialnominations.org.

  • May 14, 2015
    Guest Post

    by Nicole Fortier, counsel, Brennan Center for Justice

    It’s well known today that the United States is the biggest incarcerator in the world. With five percent of the world’s population, we house nearly a quarter of its prisoners. That’s over two million Americans behind bars. The number of people we imprison has increased over 400 percent since 1980. But in that time the federal prison population grew over 700 percent. Today, it has 208,609 inmates housed within its walls – more than any individual state.  The country now spends $80 billion per year on state and federal corrections.

    This dramatic growth was no accident. It was the direct result of laws passed in the 1980s and 1990s by policymakers hoping to combat rising crime rates. Their solution: over-criminalize and over-punish behavior – particularly at the national level. They expanded federal criminal laws, increased penalties, removed sentencing discretion from judges, and encouraged states to do the same.

    It’s clear that together, these laws cast too wide of a net. But it is important to dig further to understand whom they caught in that net. Exploring the demographics of those in federal prison can help us understand the real consequences of these policy decisions.

  • May 14, 2015

    by Caroline Cox

    Linda Greenhouse considers in The New York Times what will happen after the Supreme Court announces its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges.

    At Buzzfeed, Chris McDaniel reports that the Oklahoma Attorney General misled the Supreme Court about a letter on the availability of drugs for lethal injection.

    Edward Blum argues in the Los Angeles Times that the Supreme Court should grant review in a case that examines how Texas created its state Senate districts” and could “reestablish electoral fairness in dozens of voting districts.”

    Martin Kaste of NPR explains that police are reforming common practices and tactics in light of growing social pressure and new technologies.

    Gina Barton discusses in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel how the Tony Robison investigation illustrates the changes to investigations of police accountability.

    At SCOTUSblog, Kali Borkoski writes about Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer presiding over a mock trial of Don Quixote at the Shakespeare Theatre.