Separation of Powers and Federalism

  • March 17, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Christopher Kang, ACS Board Member and National Director of the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans

    In November 2004, Neil Gorsuch oversaw legal teams in Eastern and Central Ohio for the Bush-Cheney campaign. In an email to President George W. Bush’s Political Director Matt Schlapp, he cheered, “What a magnificent result for the country. For me personally, the experience was invigorating and a great deal of fun.” (The experience for up to 15,000 people unable to vote in Columbus, Ohio because lines stretched for hours was probably less invigorating or fun.)

    Gorsuch continued, “While I’ve spent considerable time trying to help the cause on a volunteer basis in various roles, I concluded that I’d really like to be a full-time member of the team.” 

    His resume describes the various roles in which he was politically active to “help the cause,” with greater specificity than his Senate Judiciary Questionnaire—Co-Director of Virginia Lawyers for Bush-Cheney; Bush-Cheney Marshal; RNC Bronco; and Co-Chairman of the Republican National Lawyers Association Judicial Nominations Task Force—for which the Senate Republican Conference cited his Distinguished Service to the United States Senate for his work in support of President Bush’s judicial nominees.

    As Gorsuch began his effort to “be a full-time member of the team,” the way he started and then advanced his public service career raises troubling concerns regarding his nomination to the Supreme Court. 

  • March 15, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Caroline Fredrickson

    This week marks a national initiative to highlight transparency, accountability and open government. The timing could not be better.

    Sunshine Week, March 12-18, falls the week before confirmation hearings begin for Trump’s Supreme Court pick.

    National discourse has centered on the president’s commitment to core constitutional values and his understanding of the importance of rule of law. Indeed, leading constitutional scholars have already raised red flags on numerous issues and lawsuits have been filed.

    Events of the last few months have increased the gravity of the decision about who should fill the ninth seat on the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court is often the last defense for our Constitution and it is imperative that any nominee not be beholden to any one person, let alone the president of the United States.

    Throughout his campaign and since his election, the president repeatedly emphasized that his Supreme Court nominee would be the most conservative jurist he could find, and he made sure his nominee passed a series of litmus tests, including on reproductive rights and gun safety laws. This compromises the independence of the judiciary at a time when we especially need to rely on the courts to make their own assessment of the constitutionality of legislative and executive actions. Decisions from federal judges across the country impact the lives of all of us, from how we are treated in the workplace, how the law regards women, racial minorities and those with disabilities, among others, consumer protections, the safety of our environment, our right to vote and our immigration system – just to name a few issues.

  • March 3, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece originally appeared on StateAG.org's Tierney Blog

    by James Tierney, Former Maine Attorney General and Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School

    The Maryland Legislature has finally gotten around to giving that state's outstanding AG - Brian Frosh - the authority that is enjoyed by almost every other AG, e.g. the authority to protect and defend the public interest by exercising his or her own best legal judgement without the approval of the Governor or the Legislature. This initiative finally consigns to the historical dustbin a wrongly decided 1984 decision by the Maryland Supreme Court.

    As the Rhode Island Supreme Court said in 2008, "the holder of that high office (state attorney general), as distinguished from the usual advocate, has a special and enduring duty to seek justice." State of Rhode Island v. Lead Industries Association Inc.et al., 951 A.2d 428 (R.I. 2008). 

    Residents of Maryland can now be assured that their attorney general will now work to "seek justice" for them. And other attorneys general around the country can now fully welcome Maryland into their midst.

  • February 15, 2017
    Guest Post

    *This piece originally appeared in Newsweek.

    by Ben Clements, Attorney, Clements and Pineault LLP and Chair of the Board, Free Speech for People and Ron Fein, Legal Director, Free Speech for People

    Patriotic Americans disagree on many things. But one thing almost all of us can agree on is that we are nation of laws and that no man or woman is above the law.

    And in our system of government, the supreme law that stands above all else is our founding charter, the Constitution of the United States.

    No president in our history has openly taken the position that he stands above and need not comply with the requirements of our law, especially the supreme law enshrined in our Constitution.

    Until now.

    Since the moment he took the Oath of Office and swore to uphold our Constitution, President Trump has been in direct and willful violation of these clauses.

    The Foreign Emoluments Clause states that “no person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under [the United States], shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office or Title of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State.”

  • February 13, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Matthew Stanford

    Though widely considered a dark stain on the fabric of American history, the Supreme Court’s decision in Korematsu v. United States more than 70 years ago lives on. In Korematsu, the Supreme Court upheld President Roosevelt’s executive order for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Today, the decision’s influence moves virtually undetected through the parlance of executive authority. The immense power of the president in times of “emergency and peril” has affixed itself to our constitutional DNA. The imperial presidency is not just taken for granted. It is assumed.

    The thought of another Korematsu is not far-fetched. The current administration cites an always-imminent threat of terrorism to support a religiously motivated travel ban, a supposed spike in violent crime to expand stop-and-frisk in minority neighborhoods and an invisible invasion of drug dealers and rapists from our southern border to justify mass deportation. If we are to avoid repeating history, progressives cannot afford to be short-sighted. Political victory alone does little to mend the constitutional wounds that Korematsu left behind.

    Critics of the Supreme Court decision often cite the depth to which then-Governor Earl Warren would later come to regret allowing the “cruelty of war” to cloud his better judgment. As if to say things would be different today. Regret, however, does not erase the past, much less Korematsu’s abiding tear in our constitutional fabric. Indeed, Justice Hugo Black, the opinion’s author, maintained decades later that he “would do precisely the same thing today.” And former Chief Justice William Rehnquist minced no words about executive authority to limit civil liberties being at its nadir “in time of war.”