reproductive rights

  • March 7, 2016

    by Jim Thompson

    In the Huffington Post, Geoffrey Stone, co-faculty advisor to the ACS Student Chapter at the University of Chicago Law School, discusses Justice Scalia’s failed effort “to make originalism the dominant approach to constitutional interpretation.”

    At Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, Glenn Northern presents religious arguments against two upcoming Supreme Court cases that aim to severely restrict reproductive health services at the expense of women’s religious liberties.

    Rekha Basu in The Courier blasts Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, for obstructing the judicial nominations process in a blatantly unconstitutional manner.

    “A $1.1 million corporate spending blitz that helped defeat two candidates for the Arkansas Supreme Court has prompted the state legislature to call for reforms that would either eliminate judicial elections, ban undisclosed ‘dark’ money in those races, or both,” reports Justin Miller at The American Prospect.

  • February 29, 2016

    by Jim Thompson

    At Jost on Justice, Kenneth Jost criticizes the unprecedented obstruction efforts of Senate Republicans, noting, “In the modern era of public hearings for Supreme Court confirmations that began in 1916, no nominee has been denied a hearing and only one has been denied a vote: Abe Fortas, filibustered in 1968 by Republicans.”

    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts “loathes writing in the minority,” so a shift in the high Court’s balance of power would force Roberts to moderate his views or “let himself drift into irrelevance,”  writes Mark Joseph Stern at Slate.

    Nina Martin at Mother Jones explains how Justice Antonin Scalia’s deeply conservative views on abortion may oppress reproductive rights even after his death.

    Justice Anthony Kennedy will likely cast a crucial swing vote in the upcoming Supreme Court case Whole Woman’s Health vs. Hellerstedt. Irin Carmon at MSNBC examines the factors that will influence his decision.

    In strong defense of the Second Amendment, Justice Clarence Thomas spoke from the bench for the first time in decade, reports Cristian Farias at The Huffington Post.

  • November 30, 2015

    by Jim Thompson

    In The New York Times, Linda Greenhouse writes that the birth control and abortion cases on the Supreme Court’s docket present “a battle for the secular state in which women can make their choices and design what Justice Ginsburg calls their life course, free of obstacles erected by those who would impose their religious views on others.”

    At The Washington Post, Sandhya Somashekhar explains how violent, deceiving rhetoric from anti-abortion advocates directly contributed to the shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado last Friday.

    The family of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black male fatally shot by a white police officer last year, has presented Ohio prosecutors with two new reports from former high-ranking officials at California law enforcement agencies criticizing the Cleveland officer’s actions as reckless and unreasonable, writes Mitch Smith in The New York Times.

    The Council on American-Islamic Relations has called on the Department of Justice to investigate the Thanksgiving Day shooting of a Muslim taxi driver in Pittsburgh by an Islamophobic passenger, reports Peter Holley in The Washington Post.

  • November 4, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Justice Watch, the blog for Alliance for Justice, explains why a Republican-controlled Senate does not necessarily doom the judicial confirmation process for Obama-nominated judges.

    Jeffrey Rosen has a less optimistic view, and argues in The New Republic that the death of a justice during a Republican Congress would lead to disaster.

    Russel Berman reports in The Atlantic that a challenge to the filibuster survived a recent Supreme Court challenge.

    At SCOTUSblog, Amy Howe discusses Zivotofsky v. Kerry, the Jerusalem passport case, and what yesterday’s oral argument signals about how the Supreme Court will decide the case.

    Irin Carmon of MSNBC reports on the numerous ballot measures that challenge reproductive rights throughout the country.

  • January 31, 2014
    Scores braved polar temperatures earlier this week to gather at the National Press Club for a fascinating American Constitution Society panel event on reproductive health. Entitled “Reproductive Rights and Women's Health: The States, Courts, and Congress” the two part event was headlined by an address from U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) regarding his bill, the Women’s Health Protection Act, which seeks to prohibit state and local governments from erecting barriers that prevent women from exercising their constitutionally protected reproductive rights.
    Senator Blumenthal noted that a woman’s right to make health care decisions, including the ability to obtain abortions, without government or public interference is presently facing an unprecedented number of threats and legal challenges. For example there are restrictions currently being enacted by state and local governments have the effect of deterring women from making fundamental reproductive choices. There should be no regulation applied to abortions that is not similarly applied to comparable medical procedures, the Senator noted.
    A panel discussion featuring some of the foremost scholars and practitioners in the realm of reproductive rights preceded Senator Blumenthal’s comments and was moderated by Juliet Eilperin, White House Correspondent for the Washington PostRoger Evans, Senior Director of Public Policy Litigation and Law at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, noted that the next major legal battle in this arena will be focused on a rising number of state laws that require abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges.
    Last November, Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas (and assorted affiliates) filed an emergency application with the Supreme Court to vacate a stay granted by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which temporarily blocked the permanent injunction that federal district court judge Lee Yeakel placed on Texas’ H.B. 2.  The law requires that, among other anti-choice restrictions, doctors preforming abortions must have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion clinic. The Supreme Court rejected that application, but Evans stated that it was “inevitable” that the issue of admitting privileges would eventually make it before the Court.