Reproductive freedom

  • August 6, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Nicholas Bagley argues at The Incidental Economist that the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit should rehear Halbig v. Burwell. If sustained, Halbig puts millions at risk of becoming uninsured, meeting the standard for en banc review as a case of “exceptional importance.”

    Niraj Chokshi reports for The Washington Post that Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes has filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the Supreme Court. The cert petition asks for a review of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit decision, last month, that affirmed a lower court’s determination that Utah’s same-sex marriage ban is unconstitutional.

    In The Wall Street Journal, Michelle Hackman interviews Adam Cox, Faculty Advisor for the New York University School of Law ACS Student Chapter, on the steps President Obama could take to help undocumented immigrants.

    The Diane Rehm Show hosts a debate on President Obama’s use of executive orders. Jonathan Turley, Stanley Brand and Jeffrey Rosen weigh in.

    Jamelle Bouie of Slate explains the dangers of “broken window” policing and the civil rights implications of being tough on minor offenses. 

  • August 5, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Adam Liptak of The New York Times discusses Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s recent comments on the Supreme Court’s different treatment of cases involving gay people and women. Justice Ginsburg comments suggest that the five-justice conservative majority does “not understand the challenges women face in achieving authentic equality.”

    In Slate, Emily Bazelon explains the recent decisions by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama that blocked major restrictions on abortion clinics. Despite these pro-choice victories, the legal fight against allegedly burdensome regulations on abortion clinics remains an uphill battle as a Texas law goes before the Fifth Circuit.

    Robert Barnes of The Washington Post reports that a Florida judge has found two of the state’s congressional districts unconstitutional. The decision, one of several challenging gerrymandering throughout the country, sets the stage for a possible Supreme Court case in the fall. 

    Shawn DuBravac, the chief economist of the Consumer Electronics Association, writes for the Harvard Business Review that the Supreme Court’s view on the Fourth Amendment is increasingly taking into account changing technology and the importance digital privacy.

    The New York Times’ James Barron provides the obituary for James S. Brady, White House press secretary for President Ronald Reagan and a major champion of gun control legislation.

    The Alliance for Justice published a comprehensive report detailing each federal case on the legality of a same-sex marriage ban. 

  • July 31, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    Andrew Prokop at Vox reports on the House of Representatives’ plan to sue President Obama, and what that means in a larger historical context.

    Politico’s Josh Gerstein reports on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s interview with Katie Couric, where the 81-year-old justice revealed she does not intend to step down in the near future.

    At The Volokh Conspiracy, Dale Carpenter looks at the possible role that animus could play in potential same-sex marriage litigation before the Supreme Court.

    In a piece for Salon, Katie McDonough writes about strong new pushback on recent efforts to curtail reproductive rights, including a new measure introduced by Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick to work around the recent ban on abortion clinic buffer zones.

    Writing for The Atlantic, Connor Friedersdorf discusses the legality and ethics of the NSA suppressing former head Keith Alexander’s financial disclosures as he transitions into the private sector.

  • July 30, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    Brad Smith, General Counsel and Executive Vice President for Legal and Corporate Affairs at Microsoft, writes in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that Microsoft will argue in federal court that the federal government’s classification of emails which are stored on remote servers (i.e., the cloud) are not “business records,” but rather should be afforded the same privacy protections as letters in the U.S. Mail. At the 2013 ACS National Convention, Mr. Smith was presented with a Progressive Champion Award.

    In a piece for Bloomberg News, Laurel Calkins and Andrew Harris report on a 2-1 decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirming a trial court’s entry of a preliminary injunction against a Mississippi law that requires all doctors who work at an abortion provider to obtain hospital admitting privleges. If enforced, the law would shutter  Mississippi’s lone abortion clinic.

    Sarah Solon, writing for the ACLU, discusses the drop in crime since 1990 in relation to mass incarceration, concluding that mass incarceration does not actually make communities any safer.

    MSNBC’s Ned Resnikoff reports on a major decision by the general counsel for National Labor Relations Board, ruling that the McDonald’s corporation must share joint legal responsibility for the working conditions in its franchise locations.

    Emma Green, reporting for The Atlantic, explores the Satanic Temple’s attempt to use the Hobby Lobby decision to grant their members religious exemption from “informed consent” state abortion laws, which require doctors to distribute anti-abortion information before performing an abortion. The Satanists claim that their religion calls for medical decisions to be made without clouding the mind with “unscientific” claims. 

  • July 28, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    The New York Times is calling for the federal government to repeal laws banning marijuana, saying that as a substance it is less dangerous than alcohol, and the social costs of keeping it illegal are too vast to justify its current legal status. “The social costs of the marijuana laws are vast. There were 658,000 arrests for marijuana possession in 2012, according to the FBI figures, compared with 256,000 for cocaine, heroin and their derivatives. Even worse, the result is racist, falling disproportionately on young black men, ruining their lives and creating new generations of career criminals.”

    Prachi Gupta in a piece for Salon explores the recent federal judge’s ruling that D.C.’s public handgun ban is unconstitutional.

    NPR’s Rebecca Buckwalter-Poza discusses Alabama’s high rate of death penalty sentences, especially in light of recent debate surrounding capital punishment. On MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry,” ACS Vice President of Network Advancement Sarah Knight discussed the recent Arizona death penalty debacle, where it took the state almost two hours to execute a condemned death row inmate. 

    Sarah Kliff at Vox reports on pro-choice legislators using the Supreme Court buffer zone ruling as a guideline for new, safer abortion clinics which can be protected as effectively as possible. On the same “Melissa Harris-Perry” show, ACS’s Sarah Knight joined a discussion about the Supreme Court’s opinion earlier this summer invalidating Massachusetts’ abortion clinic buffer zone law.