Minnesota

  • September 2, 2014

    by Paul Guequierre

    If you’re like me, you’re sitting at your desk on a Tuesday morning after a nice three-day weekend. Perhaps you enjoyed a nice cookout or two, went to a party, or spent the last unofficial weekend of summer finalizing your tan before fall and then winter takes us by storm. It was a great weekend. But as readers of ACSblog, you know the last three days of leisure didn’t come without the blood, sweat and tears of the labor movement. 

    The Tuesday after Labor Day weekend is the perfect time to reflect on what labor unions have done for us, and perhaps even more importantly, what we can now do for labor unions as they face attack after attack by the right-wing. From Scott Walker to Harris v. Quinn, the labor movement is in the middle of a political firestorm, on one front fending off the attacks, and on the other, continuing to fight for fair and just workplaces, livable wages and safe working environments.

  • August 4, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Sen. Bobby Joe Champion, District 59, Minnesota Senate

    As I look back over the 2014 Minnesota legislative session, there was a lot to be proud of. However, one of my most rewarding moments was watching my Expungement Bill (HF2576) pass both bodies and become law. The bill passed 58-4 with strong bipartisan support  – proving that when you have a good idea and can work in a bipartisan manner, our state legislature can get things done.

    Nearly one in five Minnesotans has an arrest or criminal record. Because of the internet, the use of criminal record checks by employers and landlords has skyrocketed. Often a person could have been arrested but not charged, or their charges were dropped, or charged but not convicted, but arrest records would still show up on the internet and in reports. Unfortunately, the online records are often inaccurate, incomplete or misinterpreted.

    It is very difficult for a former offender to integrate into our communities when an overwhelming majority of employers refuse to hire anyone with an arrest or criminal record, regardless of how long ago it was or the crime’s relevance to the position for which an applicant is being considered. A key provision in my expungement bill will change that. It requires business screening services to delete expunged records if they know a criminal record has been sealed, expunged or is the subject of a pardon.

    In addition, the expungement bill passed in 2014 will allow people convicted of misdemeanors, gross misdemeanors and some low-level felonies to get their records sealed. My expungement bill maintains public safety while providing redemptive justice for all Minnesotans. Sealing or limiting access to criminal records is an important component in successful reintegration into society.

    Although current state law allows judges to expunge the criminal records of certain offenders, they are still showing up in many background checks because a state Supreme Court decision ruled that judges could expunge only court records, not those collected by state agencies such as the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension or Department of Human Services. My expungement bill also addresses this problem and allows judges to expunge executive branch records as a means to a real remedy.

    I am proud the 2014 Expungement bill that passed in Minnesota will help remove many of the barriers associated with criminal background checks. Without this change, many Minnesotans who have taken honest steps to improve their lives are being denied employment, housing and educational opportunities. 

  • July 1, 2013
    Guest Post

    by Senator Terri Bonoff, (DFL – Minnetonka), Minnesota State Senate. Sen. Bonoff is chairperson of the Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee.

    I was a proud co-author of the Minnesota Marriage Equality Law that recently passed in our legislative session that ended May 21. As many know, the law will take effect on August 1, 2013. August 1, is my birthday. On my 50th birthday the University Avenue bridge fell, making my birthday bittersweet in the years following. While I am a “holiday” gal, love to celebrate, sharing the day with those who lost so much has made the day also marked by sorrow.

    I am pleased to mark my forthcoming birthday, with something to celebrate - marriage equality. As a Democrat from a western suburban district that leans Republican, I am truly a swing voter in every way. I not only represent swing voters I am fiercely independent myself - my votes on fiscal matters often line up with my colleagues on the other side. Yet on matters of social justice, I am clear where I stand. It is because of this that I believe I was asked to be a co-author. I told my community during the campaign that I would not vote to raise their income taxes, but I would vote to support marriage equality. I did not say, “Don’t vote for the constitutional amendment because it is not necessary - our laws dictate that only one man and one woman can marry.” Instead I said, “I am for marriage equality, and you?” There was no confusion in my community about where I stood -- I put it in newspaper surveys, on my website and spoke of it in debates.

  • May 7, 2013

    by Jeremy Leaming

    As the U.S. Supreme Court tries to figure out how it will handle California’s anti-equality law, Proposition 8, and the federal government’s equally noxious Defense of Marriage Act, a number of progressive-leaning states are moving forward on expanding liberty.

    Last week Rhode Island become the 10th state to enact legislation allowing same-sex couples to wed and it appears Minnesota and Delaware may be closely following suit. Before the Rhode Island legislature gave final approval of the marriage equality measure R.I. Gov. Lincoln D. Chafee (I), celebrated the impending law, saying, “We will be open for business, and we will once again affirm our legacy as a place that is tolerant and appreciative of diversity.”

    The Minnesota House has scheduled a vote for this week on a marriage equality bill, the Pioneer Press reports. The newspaper reports that the House speaker has determined he has the requisite votes to pass the measure and send it to the Senate, where its leaders say they are confident they have the votes to approve it. Gov. Mark Dayton said he would sign the marriage equality bill into law.  

    Delaware lawmakers are also on the verge of advancing equality. The state House has already passed a bill recognizing same-sex marriage and the Senate, the Associated Press reports, is preparing to vote today on the measure. The AP also notes the state’s Democratic Gov. Jack Markell has “promised to sign the measure ….”

    While marriage equality is hardly the capstone of LGBT equality, it is nonetheless an important part of the efforts to achieve equality under the law. (In this post, it’s noted that federal lawmakers are pushing other measures to protect LGBT people in the workforce and LGBT military families.)

    The states moving to end discrimination against same-sex couples – at least in the arena of granting marriage licenses and state benefits that come with legally recognized unions – provide a strong argument for federalism. That is, many argue – including some pro-equality individuals and groups – that states are moving along to recognize same-sex marriage and there is no reason for the Supreme Court to upset the process by, say, finding that states refusing to recognize same-sex marriage are violating the equal rights of lesbians and gay couples.

  • November 7, 2012

    by Jeremy Leaming

    The Dish headline called it the “single biggest night for gay rights in electoral history.” And it’s hard to mess with that assessment. Voters in Maryland, Maine, Washington and Minnesota voted in favor of marriage equality.

    But beyond those ballot measure victories, Andrew Sullivan reports that gay men and lesbians made up five percent of the electorate, the vast majority of them supporting Obama, “the first president to support marriage equality, and who mentioned gays by name for the first time in the history of victory speeches.”

    Then of course, there was the election of Tammy Baldwin to the U.S. Senate, the first openly gay person to serve in that chamber.

    But Sullivan’s post provides plenty of detail of the efforts to defeat the equality measures, including the funding and work of the National Organization for Marriage, a religious right outfit that strives to scuttle marriage equality by employing tired tactics of demonization. NOM says its mission is “to protect marriage and the faith communities that sustain it.” Sullivan highlights a piece from Adam Serwer reporting that NOM “believed that putting forth black and Latino spokespeople, they could discredit the idea of same-sex marriage as a civil rights cause and drive a wedge between two typically Democratic constituencies…".

    In Maryland Serwer concluded NOM’s strategy appeared rather wobbly.

    Indeed, Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Coalition, said part of the success in Maryland involved creating partnerships with other civil liberties groups, such as the NAACP, clergy and businesses, The Washington Post reported.