LGBT issues

  • May 7, 2014

    As controversy continues to surround Oklahoma’s botched execution of Clayton Lockett, a “bipartisan panel of legal experts have urged sweeping changes in what it calls the ‘deeply flawed’ administration of capital punishment.” Erik Eckholm at The New York Times reports on the panel’s proposal for execution by single-dose injections. At The Week, Andrew Cohen explains why either John Paul Stevens or Sandra Day O’Connor should lead Oklahoma’s  investigation.
     
    Writing for The New York Times, Justin Gillis reports on a new study which shows “with water growing scarcer in dry regions, torrential rains increasing in wet regions, and heat waves becoming more common and more severe…the effects of human-induced climate change are being felt in every corner of the United States.”
     
    As the Supreme Court nears the end of its term, many will be focusing on the justices’ ruling in high stakes securities class action and software patent cases. Lawrence Hurley at Reuters has the story.
     
    At The Life of the Law, Katherine Thompson writes to President Obama about immigration law and the struggles facing same-sex couples—and he writes back. 

     

     

  • April 28, 2014

    Leading gay rights groups are directing their efforts to promoting civil rights for gays and lesbians throughout the south. The “new strategy reflects the growing worry within the movement that recent legal and political successes have formed two quickly diverging worlds for lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender Americans: one centered on the coasts and major cities, and another stretching across the South.” Nicholas Confessore and Jeremy W. Peters at The New York Times have the story.
     
    Writing for The Atlantic, Andrew Cohen discusses Louisiana’s “broken justice system” and why, “by allowing non-unanimous verdicts in murder trials, the state makes it possible for prosecutors to accept minority jurors—and then discount their views.”
     
    Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in two cases which raise the question of  whether or not police can search through confiscated cellphones of arrestees without a warrant.  Lyle Denniston at SCOTUSblog previews Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie.
     
    At ISCOTUSnow, Christopher Schmidt discusses Justice Sotomayor’s dissent in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, and why the Justice’s “portrayal of oral dissenting as ‘entertainment for the press’ is not only refreshingly candid, it also happens to be a remarkably accurate.”
     
    Debbie Elliott at NPR discusses one Mississippi abortion clinic’s fight to stay open. 

     

  • April 21, 2014

    Alabama’s criminal sentencing laws have faced criticism for their ineffectiveness which “leads to overcrowded, dangerous prisons that breed more crime.” Writing for AL.com retired Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice, Sue Bell Cobb describes what the state legislature must do to “remedy this deplorable situation.”  
     
    At The Huffington PostGeoffrey R. Stone, former ACS Board Chair and current Co-Chair of the Board of Advisors for the ACS Chicago Lawyer Chapter as well as Co-Faculty Advisor for the University of Chicago Law School ACS Student Chapter, explains why his former conservative constitutional mentor Philip Kurland “would be appalled by the conduct of the current Court.”
     
    Gerard Magliocca at Concurring Opinions examines the purpose of “describing the first ten amendments as the Bill of Rights.”
     
    The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund has filed a “friend-of-the-court brief in Bostic v. Schaefer” a case which “seeks to overturn Virginia’s same-sex marriage ban.” 
  • April 17, 2014

    by ACS Staff

    New laws throughout the country are restricting access to abortion clinics. In 2013, “22 US states adopted 70 different restrictions on abortion, including late-abortion bans, doctor and clinic regulations, limits on medication abortions, and bans on insurance coverage.” Writing for The Guardian, Erika L. Sánchez explains why those who can’t reverse Roe v.  Wade are “focusing on generating enough red tape to shut down as many abortion facilities as possible.”
     
    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit is preparing for oral argument in a case challenging Oklahoma’s same-sex marriage ban. Similar to Utah’s controversial law at issue in Kitchen v. Herbert, Oklahoma’s law “prohibits gay couples from marrying and prevents the state government from recognizing such unions performed anywhere else.”  Emma Margolin at MSNBC breaks down Bishop v. Oklahoma.  

    Writing for The New York Times, ACS Board Member Linda Greenhouse breaks down McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission and its “indecent burial” of campaign finance.

    Tonight on C-SPAN, Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia will discuss the First Amendment and “the contemporary meaning of freedom.”  

     

  • April 16, 2014
     
    On Tuesday, the New York Police Department 
    announced that it would shut down a special unit that spied on Muslim groups. Known as the “Demographics Unit,” the squad allegedly “mapped communities inside and outside the city, logging where customers in traditional Islamic clothes ate meals and documenting their lunch-counter conversations.” Matt Apuzzo and Joseph Goldstein at The New York Times report on the controversy surrounding the NYPD. 
     
    India’s Supreme Court recently recognized transgender rights. In National Legal Services v. Union of India, the court recognized the pain and struggle felt by the transgender community while stressing the historical importance of the group within India’s diverse culture. Faculty Advisor for the City University of New York School of Law ACS Student Chapter Ruthann Robson writes at Constitutional Law Prof Blog that the court’s decision “not only requires the government to recognize a ‘third gender’… but also directs the government to take positive steps in education, health provisions, and ‘seriously address’ various problems.”
     
    Last week, Utah defended its ban on same-sex marriage before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Kitchen v. Herbert. During the hearings, state officials were “surprisingly straightforward in explaining that its marriage law is based directly upon its citizens’ religious values.” At Hamilton and Griffin on Rights Leslie C. Griffin, Co-Faculty Advisor for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law ACS Student Chapter, argues against religious-based law and why, when it comes to the same-sex marriage debate, “Utah has it backwards.”
     
    Juan Haines at The Life of the Law  describes District Attorney of Santa Clara County Jeff Rosen’s visit to a San Quentin jail where he spoke with inmates about “crime, punishment, rehabilitation, and reentry.”