LGBT issues

  • May 15, 2014
     
    At The Daily BeastGeoffrey R. Stone, former ACS Board Chair and current Co-Chair of the Board of Advisors for the ACS Chicago Lawyer Chapter as well as Co-Faculty Advisor for the University of Chicago Law School ACS Student Chapter, discusses how we can “trace unequal education funding back to a horrendous, little-remembered 1973 [Supreme Court] decision.”

    Saturday marks the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Lesli A. Maxwell at Education Week explains why “school diversity remains more complex than ever.”

    Amanda Holpuch at The Guardian comments on a report by Human Rights Watch which shows how young children who are “planting, weeding, and harvesting nicotine plants” are being “endangered by nicotine exposure in tobacco fields.”

    At the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Judith E. Schaeffer notes that “when it comes to marriage discrimination, the Commonwealth of Virginia has a great deal to learn from its own history.”

    Writing for CNN, Eric Segall urges the Supreme Court to televise its oral arguments and argues why life tenures for the justices must be removed. 

  • May 14, 2014
    At The New York Times, Charlie Savage discusses why the Obama administration is being accused of ignoring “statements it made to the Supreme Court about warrantless surveillance.”
     
    Yesterday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit granted a stay of the execution for Robert 
    James Cambell due to his intellectual disability. Mark Berman at The Washington Post reports on what “would have been the eighth execution in Texas and the 21st execution in the country so far this year.”
     
    The Court of Justice of the European Union issued a ruling yesterday that experts say “could force Google and other search engines to delete references to old debts, long-ago arrests and other unflattering episodes.” The Associated Press addresses the implications of the court’s decision.
     
    Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is calling for the impeachment of Arkansas Judge Christopher Piazza who struck down the gay marriage ban that Gov. Huckabee signed into law 17 years ago. Mario Trujillo at The Hill has the story.
     
    Writing for The Daily Beast, Daniel I. Weiner discusses “the worst campaign finance ruling” since Citizens United
  • May 12, 2014

    As education inequality increases, hostilities between public education and charter schools continue. Although many charter schools were established to “develop test kitchens for practices that could be exported into the traditional schools” it has “proved difficult to encourage the kind of sharing of ideas that charter schools were originally supposed to foster, given competitive dynamics.” Javier C. Hernandez at The New York Times comments on “charter and public schools and a chasm between.”
     
    Garrett Epps at The Atlantic describes a troubling scene which resulted in the shooting of an innocent man when a law enforcement official mistakenly accused him of car theft. In his article, Epps breaks down Tolan v. Cotton, in which for “the first time in a decade” the Supreme Court “held against law enforcement in a ‘qualified immunity’ case.”
     
    Adam Liptak at The New York Times discusses how “the deep and often angry divisions among [Supreme Court] justices are but a distilled version of the way American intellectuals — at think tanks and universities, in opinion journals and among the theorists and practitioners of law and politics — have separated into two groups with vanishingly little overlap or interaction.”
     
    The controversial execution of Clayton Lockett raised new questions about the merits of capital punishment in America. Boer Deng and Dahlia Lithwick at Slate explain why “in the push to abolish capital punishment, opponents of the death penalty have made it less safe.”
     
    Last week, an Arkansas state trial judge struck down the state’s ban on same-sex marriage. Lyle Denniston at SCOTUSblog breaks down Wright v. Arkansas

     

     

  • May 9, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Eric Lesh, Fair Courts Project Manager, Lambda Legal

    *Lambda Legal brought the case of Garden State Equality, et al. v. Dow, et al., which secured the right to marry for same-sex couples in New Jersey.   

    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has until June 29 to decide whether he will preserve the independence of the state’s nationally renowned judiciary or continue to retaliate against members of the New Jersey Supreme Court for decisions that he characterizes as “liberal” and “activist.”

    On October 21, 2013, the fight to bring the freedom to marry to New Jersey ended in a resounding victory when the New Jersey Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision by Chief Justice Stuart Rabner, refused to delay the lower court win in Garden State Equality v. Dow. The Supreme Court agreed that there was no public interest in depriving a group of New Jersey residents of their constitutional right to equal protection while the appeals process continued.
     

  • May 9, 2014

    Yesterday, Oklahoma officials delayed the execution of Charles F. Warne. The decision comes just a week after the botched execution of Clayton D. Lockett which left him “writhing in pain before he died of heart failure.” Erik Eckholm at The New York Times reports on the state of capital punishment in the Sooner State.
     
    Labor groups will be looking to get national attention next week as they kick-off fast-food protests in the U.S. and around the world. The Washington Post reports that the protest efforts are coming “at a time when the widening income gap has become a pressing issue” and fewer workers are aware of their rights.
     
    Following the Supreme Court’s decision in Town of Greece v. Galloway, the justices will decide whether to hear oral argument in a case involving a public school graduation ceremony held at a church. Mark Walsh at Education Week’s School Law Blog breaks down Elmbrook School District v. Doe
     
    Jennifer Bard at Prawfblawg analyzes the problems facing legal education and “what we must do to make students not just practice ready but work ready.”
     
    Lambda Legal’s Blog notes an important victory for same sex couples in Indiana.