Labor law

  • September 5, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Simon Maloy argues in Salon that the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C.  to hold an en banc rehearing of Halbig v. Burwell represents a major victory for Obamacare supporters.  Richard Wolf of USA Today asserts that the rehearing illustrates the impact of the president’s appointed judges.  Read more about the Halbig case on the ACSBlog.

    In The New York Times, David Firestone writes on the preliminary injunction entered by Judge Peter C. Economus of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio which blocks efforts to limit early voting in Ohio.

    Dominic Rushe, Lauren Gambino, Rory Carroll, and Mark Guarino report for The Guardian on the arrests of hundreds of fast-food workers protesting against low wages in cities throughout the country.

    Matt Apuzzo writes for The New York Times that Stuart F. Delery will replace Tony West in the Justice Department.  Delery will be the highest ranking openly gay man to serve in the DOJ. 

    In The Washington Post, Sari Horwitz, Carol D. Leonnig, and Kimberly Kindy report that the Justice Department will launch a civil rights investigation into the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department.  

  • September 2, 2014

    by Caroline Cox

    Eric J. Segall, who spoke at the ACS Supreme Court Review in June, profiles in Salon Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and his rulings on high-profile cases that are likely to be decided by the Supreme Court.

    In The New York Times, Adam Liptak reports that Supreme Court justices are increasingly putting data from amicus briefs into their opinions.

    Robert J. Samuelson argues in The Washington Post that more workers are at the mercy of the market and questions whether this trend will continue.  

    Vanita Gupta argues at CNN that drug laws are too harsh and out of step with public opinion.

    The question of how much oversight the federal government can have over state voter ID laws is up for debate in Texas, reports Laurel Brubaker Calkins for Bloomberg

  • September 2, 2014

    by Paul Guequierre

    If you’re like me, you’re sitting at your desk on a Tuesday morning after a nice three-day weekend. Perhaps you enjoyed a nice cookout or two, went to a party, or spent the last unofficial weekend of summer finalizing your tan before fall and then winter takes us by storm. It was a great weekend. But as readers of ACSblog, you know the last three days of leisure didn’t come without the blood, sweat and tears of the labor movement. 

    The Tuesday after Labor Day weekend is the perfect time to reflect on what labor unions have done for us, and perhaps even more importantly, what we can now do for labor unions as they face attack after attack by the right-wing. From Scott Walker to Harris v. Quinn, the labor movement is in the middle of a political firestorm, on one front fending off the attacks, and on the other, continuing to fight for fair and just workplaces, livable wages and safe working environments.

  • August 1, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    The New York Times Editorial Board discusses a recent decision by the National Labor Relations Board general counsel which found McDonald’s jointly responsible for the treatment of its workers at all of its franchises and argues that this should spur an increase in wages for fast food workers.

    Writing for SCOTUSblog, Lyle Denniston reports that challengers of the provision of the Affordable Care Act which provides subsides to those who obtain health insurance via the federal exchange are rushing their case to the Supreme Court, after two federal appellate courts delivered opposite rulings on the issue last month..

    At Politico, Laura W. Murphy compares attempts to reform the National Security Agency in the wake of revelations about the scope of its spying to successful efforts to limit the disparities in drug sentencing born from the War on Drugs.

    Benjamin Wittes writes at Lawfare about the CIA inspector general’s report regarding alleged hacking of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) staff files and records by the CIA.

  • July 30, 2014

    by Ellery Weil

    Brad Smith, General Counsel and Executive Vice President for Legal and Corporate Affairs at Microsoft, writes in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that Microsoft will argue in federal court that the federal government’s classification of emails which are stored on remote servers (i.e., the cloud) are not “business records,” but rather should be afforded the same privacy protections as letters in the U.S. Mail. At the 2013 ACS National Convention, Mr. Smith was presented with a Progressive Champion Award.

    In a piece for Bloomberg News, Laurel Calkins and Andrew Harris report on a 2-1 decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirming a trial court’s entry of a preliminary injunction against a Mississippi law that requires all doctors who work at an abortion provider to obtain hospital admitting privleges. If enforced, the law would shutter  Mississippi’s lone abortion clinic.

    Sarah Solon, writing for the ACLU, discusses the drop in crime since 1990 in relation to mass incarceration, concluding that mass incarceration does not actually make communities any safer.

    MSNBC’s Ned Resnikoff reports on a major decision by the general counsel for National Labor Relations Board, ruling that the McDonald’s corporation must share joint legal responsibility for the working conditions in its franchise locations.

    Emma Green, reporting for The Atlantic, explores the Satanic Temple’s attempt to use the Hobby Lobby decision to grant their members religious exemption from “informed consent” state abortion laws, which require doctors to distribute anti-abortion information before performing an abortion. The Satanists claim that their religion calls for medical decisions to be made without clouding the mind with “unscientific” claims.