Guest Post

  • November 21, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Erwin Chemerinsky and Samuel Kleiner. Chemerinsky is Dean of the University of California, Irvine School of Law; Kleiner is a fellow at the Yale Law Information Society Project.

    In the face of an ongoing humanitarian crisis as families are broken up by deportations, President Obama’s bold executive action is legally permissible and morally necessary. The angry Republican rhetoric is misguided both as a matter of constitutional law and as a matter of desirable social policy.

    In terms of the Constitution, President Obama drew a careful distinction based on what he can and can't do without congressional action. The President cannot bestow citizenship on individuals except as authorized by law. President Obama’s executive order does not attempt to do this. 

    But what a president may do is set enforcement priorities, choosing who to prosecute or who to deport. No government brings prosecutions against all who violate the law. Resources make that impossible and there are laws on the books that should not be enforced. Nor has any administration, Democratic or Republican, sought to deport every person who is illegally in the United States.   For humanitarian reasons or because of foreign policy considerations or for lack of resources, the government often chooses to focus deportations along certain criteria.

    In fact, as recently as two years ago, the Supreme Court in United States v. Arizona recognized that an inherent part of executive control over foreign policy is the ability of the President to choose whether or not to bring deportation proceedings. On numerous other occasions, the Supreme Court and lower federal courts have recognized prosecutorial discretion to decide when to bring criminal prosecutions or immigration enforcement actions.

    The overblown Republican rhetoric fails to recognize that what President Obama announced was enforcement priorities. He has instructed the executive branch, which is under his control, to prioritize deportation proceedings against felons and those who pose a public danger, but not to deport parents of young children who are United States citizens and who present no threat.   Such discretion is clearly and unquestionably part of the president’s power.     

    Nor is there any realistic chance that any court will find otherwise. No one is likely to have standing to challenge President Obama’s policy. And even if a court were to address the issue, the law is well established that presidents have discretion to decide whether to prosecute or bring deportation actions. Contrary to the Republican rhetoric, President Obama is violating no law and is acting within his constitutional authority.

  • November 21, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Lisa HeinzerlingJustice William J. Brennan, Jr. Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center. The author was a political appointee at the Environmental Protection Agency from January 2009 to December 2010. She served on the EPA Presidential Transition Team in 2008.

    The Environmental Protection Agency is under court order to issue, by December 1, a proposal to retain or revise the national air quality standards for ground-level ozone. Scientific studies have linked ozone, also known as smog, to a variety of adverse effects on public health and welfare. EPA's expert staff and its outside scientific advisors have recommended, based on this scientific evidence, that EPA set new, stronger standards for ozone. The Clean Air Act requires that air quality standards – "primary" standards for public health, "secondary" standards for public welfare – be set at levels "requisite to protect" public health and welfare. A central question for the proposal to be issued by December 1 is whether the current air quality standards for ozone, set at 75 parts per billion of ozone in the ambient air, adequately provide such protection.

    At the moment, EPA's preferred approach to the ozone standards awaits White House clearance. EPA has sent a regulatory package – likely including, as is customary, the proposed standards, a formal explanation of EPA's choices, and an economic analysis of the proposal – to the White House for review. Under executive orders issued by Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, the President has asserted the authority to review significant agency rules like the ozone standard and to reject or revise them if they are not consistent with his policies or priorities. President Obama exercised this self-given power previously in the context of ozone, when in 2011 he ordered then-EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson to withdraw stronger, revised national air quality standards for ozone. As I will explain, President Obama's past exercise of power hangs over the current decision whether to revise the ozone standards.

    Before President Obama ordered Administrator Jackson to withdraw the revised ozone standards she had developed, the EPA under Administrator Jackson had been working on the revised standards for years, indeed since the day President Obama took office. Revision was necessary, in EPA's view, because standards set during the administration of President George W. Bush had departed from the scientific evidence indicating that stronger rules were necessary to protect public health and welfare. Indeed, EPA's scientific advisors on air quality had reacted to the Bush-era standards by issuing a pointed, unsolicited rebuke, stating that the advisors did not endorse the Bush standards. Strengthening the Bush-era ozone standards was a core EPA priority in the early days of the Obama administration, offering an opportunity both to protect public health and welfare and to return the agency to scientifically sound decision making. No one would have guessed, then, that President Obama would eventually order Administrator Jackson to back off and leave the Bush-era standards in place. But that's what happened.

  • November 21, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Thomas NolanAssociate Professor of Criminology & Director of Graduate Programs in Criminology, Merrimack College; former Senior Policy Advisor at the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; former lieutenant, Boston Police Department

    Attorney General Eric Holder recently announced an initiative sponsored by the Department of Justice through the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Office of Community Oriented Police Services that provides guidance and support for law enforcement agencies in their response to protesters who are engaging in constitutionally protected activities, particularly those activities protected by the First Amendment such as freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and freedom of the press. The provision of this guidance appears to coincide with the expected announcement of the findings of a grand jury hearing evidence in the case of the death of Michael Brown at the hands of Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri on August 9, 2014.

    In the aftermath of the shooting death of Brown, the world watched as protesters took to the streets in Ferguson and were met with a hyper-exaggerated, highly militarized response from the police in Ferguson that unilaterally trounced the First Amendment rights of the protesters and unequivocally suspended the provisions of the United States Constitution that guarantee the protections of free speech, free assembly, and a free press.  The world saw law enforcement officers engage in a shameless and hysterical display of unrestrained force against a relatively small group of largely peaceful protesters using sound cannons (designed for use in wars by the military), tear gas (chemical weapons banned by the Geneva Conventions for use during war), rubber bullets (potentially lethal), smoke bombs and grenades, stun grenades (potentially lethal), wood bullet projectiles, pepper pellet rounds (of the type that killed student Victoria Snelgrove in Boston in 2004), and bean bag rounds (also potentially lethal).

  • November 20, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Adam Cox, Professor of Law, New York University School of Law, and Cristina Rodriguez, the Leighton Homer Surbeck Professor of Law, Yale Law School

    *Professors Cox and Rodriguez have commenced a symposium at Balkinization, which we're cross-posting.
     
    Tonight, President Obama announced sweeping administrative reform of immigration law. His efforts raise important questions about the legal basis for his actions and its implications for the future of immigration law and the separation of powers.
     
    Over the next several days, we will convene an online symposium here, on Balkinization, to discuss and debate these issues with a group of leading immigration law and constitutional law scholars and litigators.  While much ink has been spilled in recent months over the legality of administrative immigration relief, much of that writing has been necessarily speculative.  Now we know the basic facts.  The President’s administration will exercise prosecutorial discretion to defer the removal of many parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, making them eligible for work authorization for up to three years at a time.  This action is estimated to encompass 3.3 million unauthorized immigrants.  When combined with the last round of administrative relief—the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Initiative—roughly 5 million persons, or 40 percent of the unauthorized population, may be affected.
     
    As the President’s announcement made clear, however, there will be limits to his exercise of discretion.  The parents of DACA recipients will not be included.  This is an extremely important fact—not just as a political matter, but also, potentially, as a legal one.  Over the course of recent debate, writers on all sides of the issue have struggled mightily to avoid a central question about the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in immigration law: how far is too far?  Opponents have argued that the president has crossed the line into unconstitutionality; defenders have contended that he has not. But almost no one has been willing to say where that line is located.  Tonight that changed.  An opinion from the Office of Legal Counsel, made public by the administration, lays out the legal basis for the President’s actions and provides scholars with new theories of executive power and prosecutorial discretion to explore.  Importantly, that opinion concludes that, while the President has authority to grant relief to the parents of US citizens and LPRs, the President lacks legal authority to grant such relief to the parents of DACA recipients.
     
    We are among those who believe the basic parameters of executive discretion in immigration law permit the President to take the steps he has.[1] But the OLC opinion raises important questions about the limits of discretion, as well as a new gloss on the legal issues—the legal claim that the President’s actions are consistent with congressional priorities as reflected in the Immigration and Nationality Act.  
     
    The combination of the President’s sweeping action with an official government defense of the program’s legality—something that did not accompany DACA—makes now a crucial moment to discuss two fundamental questions that have long been embedded in the debate over administrative relief.  First, the question of scope: of how the size and composition of the group offered administrative relief bears on relief’s legality.  Second, the question of how the form of relief—that is, the precise benefits that are conferred through administrative action—affect its legality?
     
    These and other questions will be ones that we and the other symposium participants will engage and debate in the coming days.

     

     
  • November 17, 2014
    Guest Post

    by Reuben A. Guttman, Director, Grant & Eisenhofer; Member, ACS Board of Directors

    *This post originally appeared on The Global Legal Post.

    The United States Chamber of Commerce, a few academics and some media pundits have their lists of cases arguably supporting the proposition that people will sue over anything and hence the need for tort reform to prevent so called 'frivolous litigation.' Out of the countless number of cases filed each year in United States federal and state courts, the tort reformers love to harp on the suit brought by the woman against McDonalds for serving hot coffee and the class action now pending against Subway for allegedly misrepresenting the size of its advertised foot-long sandwiches.    

    Golden oldies

    Since the tort reformers seem to keep dwelling on the same few cases, it might be worth mentioning a few oldies but goodies which have eluded their attention. First, there is the “classroom kick case” where an elementary school child was sued for kicking another student on the knee.  This heinous event occurred in a classroom. The court allowed the case to go forward, holding that if the offending kicker had made his offensive contact on the playground, the kick might have been permissible.

    Then there is the “falling scale case” involving a man on a railroad platform; running to jump on a train, he was pulled on board by a conductor.  Struggling to board the moving rail car, the man dropped a package containing fireworks; the fireworks exploded, knocking a scale down at the end of the platform.  The scale fell on another man who sued the railroad!