Criminal Justice

  • October 19, 2016
    Guest Post

    *This piece was originally posted on the Brennan Center for Justice's blog

    by Andrew Cohen, Fellow, Brennan Center for Justice

    There used to be an old saying about legal education in America: Law school does not prepare you to take the bar exam and the bar exam does not prepare you to be a lawyer. I do not know if that is still true or not, although I suspect it is. It sure was 25 years ago when I graduated from law school, took the bar exam and then began practice as a baby lawyer in Denver.

    Next week I will be in my beloved Boston—what, no World Series game at Fenway?—to speak to law school students, professors and alumni and I cannot help thinking that there is one critical course that is missing from the curriculum at even the most forward-thinking law schools across the country. Too many of those schools teach students about what they wish the law to be rather than what the law really is.

    First-year students take criminal law and criminal procedure and they learn about mens rea and the Model Penal Code. What’s missing from law school curricula, however, is a required course that ought to be titled: “Criminal Injustice.” The course would track the countless ways in which our nation’s justice systems fail to provide justice to countless Americans. Only such a class would adequately prepare new lawyers—whether they end up being prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges or not—for the reality of what is happening in the nation’s courtrooms, prisons, jails and police stations.

    The imaginary syllabus I have conjured almost writes itself. It would begin with a section on police training, recruitment and unions so that students could better understand why police reform is so hard to achieve. We would also address in this section the culture of prisons and how they are so often staffed with overworked and underpaid men and women, to understand why our prisons are a national disgrace. The culture of silence, of a lack of accountability and transparency, helps explain why there are so many excessive force cases and wrongful convictions and documented instances of abuse and neglect in confinement.

  • September 30, 2016
    Guest Post

    by Danielle Lang, Deputy Director of Voting Rights and Anna Bodi, Partner Legal Fellow at The Campaign Legal Center

    Larry Joe Newby is a U.S. citizen living in Huntsville, Alabama. Mr. Newby is married, attends church, is raising his two adopted grandsons and works for the County as an assistant supervisor. However, due to a few minor non-violent offenses from well over a decade ago, Mr. Newby has not been able to vote and will not be able to cast a ballot this November. Mr. Newby is just one of the 5.85 million citizens whose voices have been silenced by felony disenfranchisement laws across the United States. 75 percent of these disenfranchised voters are no longer in prison, but are still unable to vote.

    Unwilling to accept the denial of his fundamental right to vote, Mr. Newby is a named plaintiff in a new lawsuit filed by the Campaign Legal Center, alongside a team of pro bono and civil rights litigators, that could finally turn the page on a dark history of discriminatory felon disenfranchisement in Alabama and nationwide.

    Alabama’s Strict and Discriminatory Felon Disenfranchisement Regime

    Alabama has one of the most severe and discriminatory felon disenfranchisement laws in the nation: it is one of only 12 states that permanently disenfranchise some or all citizens convicted of felony offenses and, as a result, disenfranchises 7% of its total voting age population and 15% of its black voting age population.

  • August 15, 2016

    By Kevin Battersby Witenoff

    The Seventh Circuit Court was unwilling to extend Title VII non-discrimination protection based on sexual orientation, reports George M. Patterson at The National Law Review

    David G. Savage at the Los Angeles Times reports North Carolina and Wisconsin lawyers are attacking gerrymandered electoral maps that ensure suppression of voters of particular races and party affiliation.

    The Editorial Board at The New York Times shares the difficulties of citizens in Sparta, Ga. who experience overt voter suppression reminiscent of Jim Crow.  

    After a report released by the Department of Justice exposed the Federal Bureau of Prisons’ failure to appropriately monitor and control regulations in for-profit prisons, Carl Takei reexamines their necessity in an op-ed for The Marshall Project

  • August 10, 2016
    Since discontinuing “Stop and Frisk” policies, which disproportionately target African and Latino Americans, New York City’s crime rate has decreased dramatically, reports Brentin Mock at City Lab.
    Adam Liptak at The New York Times cites a new study showing criminal defendants appearing in front of the Supreme Court are less likely to have expert counsel than any other type of defendant. 
    J. Lester Feder and Nikki Tsukamoto Kininmonth explain in a recent article on BuzzFeed how, even after a 2003 law allowed for individuals to change their legal gender, doctors in Japan are using an antiquated and oppositional diagnosis to help Transgender people.
    According to an article by Elizabeth Olson in The New York Times, the American Bar Association is considering an amendment to its model rules of professional conduct that would prohibit harassment and discrimination by practicing lawyers.  
  • May 18, 2016
    Guest Post

    by Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr., Clinical Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Harvard Law School            

    This week the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of Lamondre Tucker, an African-American man who was sentenced to death in 2011―under the banner of the Confederate flag. Tucker was convicted in Caddo Parish, Louisiana, a county that is plagued by racially biased jury selection. One recent study found that African-Americans have been excluded from juries in Caddo Parish at a rate that is three times higher than whites, a practice so insidious that it has earned the nickname “blackstriking.”

    An amicus brief filed by the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice in Tucker v. Louisiana notes, “Of the twenty death sentences imposed in the modern era by Caddo Parish juries, fifteen were imposed on Black defendants. Of those fifteen, ten were charged with the murder of a white victim. Conversely, no white defendant has ever been sentenced to death in Caddo Parish for killing a Black victim. Taken at face value, these numbers suggest that the badges of the Confederacy adorning the courthouse entrance in Caddo Parish signify more than stale remnants of a bygone era.”

    Unfortunately, Tucker’s case is not an isolated incident. Just last month, Kenneth Fults was executed by the state of Georgia despite being represented by a lawyer known for using racial slurs. Fults, an African-American man, was accused of killing a young white woman. After the trial, one of the jurors reportedly explained, "that n***r got just what should have happened . . . I knew I would vote for the death penalty because that’s what that n***r deserved."

    Duane Buck’s case was equally contaminated by racial bias. Buck, an African-American man, was sentenced to death for a crime that occurred 20 years ago after a defense expert testified that Buck’s race was a relevant predictor of his future dangerousness. The prosecutor subsequently asserted that "the race factor, black, increases the future dangerousness . . ." The Texas jury sentenced Mr. Buck to death based upon the finding that he was likely to be a danger in the future. Mr. Buck has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review his case.

    In South Carolina, Johnny Bennett had his death sentence reversed by U.S. District Judge Mark Gergel because the prosecutor, Donnie Myers, called Bennett, an African-American man, “King Kong,” a “beast of burden,” and other racist names during his trial. Myers also highlighted the fact that Bennett had a sexual relationship with a “blonde-headed lady” in order to fan the flames of racial prejudice. The state attorney general has, not surprisingly, announced that he is appealing Judge Gergel’s decision.

    Even when offered a chance to correct injustices of the not-so-distant past, many prosecutors cling to racially tainted verdicts. These cases are not relics of the past, they are evidence that racial bias continues to infect the entire capital punishment system.