Class actions

  • January 27, 2015

    by Nanya Springer

    The Constitutional Accountability Center recently released the fifth installment of its year-long series, “Roberts at 10,” in which Brianne Gorod details the ways Chief Justice John Roberts’ voting record has undermined the public’s access to the courts.  She points out that Roberts has consistently taken positions limiting the scope of the standing doctrine, heightening pleading requirements, restricting exceptions to state sovereign immunity and expanding arbitration.  In fact, as Gorod notes, the Chief Justice has sided with the majority in every significant decision bolstering mandatory arbitration agreements, while every case expanding access to the courts has received his emphatic dissent.

    This restricted access to the courts, and in particular the expansion of arbitration as a mandatory alternative dispute remedy, has had far-reaching negative consequences for consumers and workers.  Governed by the Federal Arbitration Act, written arbitration agreements have become a ubiquitous, lurking menace, surfacing to harm consumers again and again and again

  • December 13, 2013

    by Caroline Fredrickson, ACS President

    Since its founding in 2001, ACS has enjoyed the great fortune of a consistently strong Board of Directors, with some of the nation’s leading academics, practitioners and activists serving. At our recently scheduled Board meeting we said goodbye to a few long-serving members and selected a new Board chair, David M. Brodsky.  

    David’s legal career is a highly distinguished one. He was formerly a partner of the global law firm Latham & Watkins LLP. Some of his duties included advising foreign and domestic companies with respect to investigations of suspected criminal conduct, complex securities litigation, including class actions and other regulatory investigations and enforcement actions.   

    He is now the sole principal of a mediation and arbitration firm in New York City. Before launching Brodsky ADR LLC to help effectively solve complex disputes, David spent decades building a nationally recognized reputation as one of this nation’s greatest trial lawyers.

    There’s more to the story. David has served as a federal prosecutor, a general counsel to an investment bank and on numerous pro bono boards. His energy and dedication to the legal profession and to making justice accessible is extraordinary. Indeed his very rich, varied legal career has won him honors from numerous national legal publications, being consistently named among the top 100 “Super Lawyers” in New York and listed in the 2012 Best Lawyers in America survey.

    David, in an eloquent ACSblog post, paid tribute to some of ACS’s long-serving Board members whose terms recently ended. But ACS members, supporters and friends should get to know David. He’s an inspiring figure and a tireless advocate of ACS’s work. We’re grateful he’s taken a leadership role on the Board.  

    [image via Brodsky ADR LLC]

  • November 25, 2013
     
    Every year, a few blockbuster Supreme Court oral arguments and decisions dominate the news. In 2013, voting rights, LGBT equality, and affirmative action in education took center stage. Many Americans, whether lawyers or not, understood that these decisions could affect their own lives.
     
    Almost under the radar, however, the Court has been chipping away at the very process that enables the American people to seek redress in court when they’ve been injured. In particular, the Court’s decisions enforcing arbitration clauses and class action waivers have closed the courthouse door to litigants harmed by corporate wrongdoing. Most recently, in American Express Corp v. Italian Colors last Term, the Court ruled that class action waivers are enforceable even when they render it functionally impossible for plaintiffs to vindicate their rights under federal law.
     
    Rich Freer, the Robert Howell Professor of Law at Emory Law School, explains the impact of these cases.
     

  • August 27, 2013
    Guest Post


    by Scott Michelman, attorney, Public Citizen Litigation Group Michelman wrote the plaintiffs’ successful petition to appeal in Roach v. T.L. Cannon, and will brief and argue the case before the Second Circuit.

    When big corporations have a legal problem, they usually have no shortage of legal help - from lawyers on their own payroll or from large law firms to whom they pay hundreds of dollars an hour.

    When ordinary wage-earners have a legal problem - such as being underpaid at work - obtaining relief can be a bigger challenge. Most people can't afford to hire a big law firm, and even if the amount of a legal dispute is significant to the individual, it may not be large enough to entice a for-profit lawyer to take the case.

    One of our system's most important tools for leveling the playing field and providing access to the courts is the class action. This device enables people who have been wronged in a similar way to join together to pursue relief in court. Even if the value of the case to each individual is small, the aggregation of the claims makes the case big enough for a lawyer to pursue it.

  • August 1, 2013
    Guest Post

    by Reuben Guttman, Director and Head of False Claims Group, Grant & Eisenhofer.

    Over the past several years, we have had the privilege of representing whistleblowers who have successfully pursued False Claims Act cases against some of the largest pharmaceutical manufacturers in the world. Cases against Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbott Labs, Amgen, and most recently Wyeth which was acquired by Pfizer, resulted in the companies returning over $7 billion to government healthcare payors.   

    Viewed from the optics of the black letter law, these cases are about whether false or fraudulent statements cause the government to pay for drugs that doctors would not have otherwise prescribed. Yet, in human terms, these cases raise the question of whether corporate marketing goals are influencing medical decisions.